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SANITATION
Sanitation
27
Cosmetology
08/15/2013

Additional Cosmetology Flashcards

 


 

Cards

Term

065) The strongest level of decontamination is:

A) Antiseptic

B) Sanitation

 C) Disinfection 

D) Sterlization

Definition

                           STERILIZATION         

From the highest to lowest, the levels of Decontamination are:            STERLIZATION...DISINFECTION...SANITATION

SANITATION

also known as sanitizing; a chemical process of reducing the number of disease-causing germs on cleaned surfaces to a safe level

1. To eliminate contamination in. 

2. To make safe by eliminating poisonous or otherwise harmful substances, such as noxious chemicals or radioactive material.

Disinfection 

is the process that eliminates most, but not necessarily all, microorganisms on nonliving surfaces. This process is not effective against bacterial spores. In the salon setting, disinfection is extremely effective in controlling microorganisms on surfaces such as shears, nippers, and other multiuse tools and equipment

STERILIZATION

Sterilization is the process that completely destroys all microbial life, including spores. The most effective methods of sterilization use high-pressure steam equipment called autoclaves. Simply exposing instruments to steam is not enough. To be effective against disease-causing pathogens, the steam must be pressurized in an autoclave so that the steam penetrates the spore coats of the spore-forming bacteria. Dry heat forms of sterilization are less efficient and require longer times at higher temperatures. Dry heat sterilization is not recommended for use in salons

Decontamination Method 1 has two steps: cleaning and disinfecting. Remember that when you clean, you must remove all visible dirt and debris from tools, implements, and equipment by washing with liquid soap and warm water and by using a clean and disinfected nail brush to scrub any grooved or hinged portions of the item. A surface is properly cleaned when the number of contaminants on the surface is greatly reduced. In turn, this reduces the risk of infection. The vast majority of contaminants and pathogens can be removed from the surfaces of tools and implements through proper cleaning. This is why cleaning is an important part of disinfecting tools and equipment. A surface must be properly cleaned before it can be properly disinfected. Using a disinfectant without cleaning first is like using mouthwash without brushing your teeth—it just does not work properly! Cleaned surfaces can still harbor small amounts of pathogens, but the presence of fewer pathogens means infections are less likely to be spread. Putting antiseptics on your skin or washing your hands with soap and water will drastically lower the number of pathogens on your hands. However, it does not clean them properly. The proper cleaning of the hands requires rubbing hands together and using liquid soap, warm running water, a nail brush, and a clean towel. Do not underestimate the importance of proper cleaning and hand washing. They are the most powerful and important ways to prevent the spread of infection.

There are three ways to clean your tools or implements:

• Washing with soap and warm water, then scrubbing them with  a clean and properly disinfected nail brush. 

• Using an ultrasonic unit.

• Using a cleaning solvent (e.g., on metal bits for electric files).

The second step of Decontamination Method 1 is disinfection. Remember that disinfection is the process that eliminates most, but not necessarily all, microorganisms on nonliving surfaces. This process is not effective against bacterial spores. In the salon setting, disinfection is extremely effective in controlling microorganisms on surfaces such as shears, nippers, and other multiuse tools and equipment. Remember that disinfectants are products that destroy all bacteria, fungi, and viruses (but not spores) on surfaces. Disinfectants are not for use on human skin, hair, or nails. All disinfectants clearly state on the label that you should avoid skin contact. This means avoid contact with your skin as well as the client’s. Do not put your fingers directly into any disinfecting solution.  If you mix a disinfectant in a container that is not labeled by the manufacturer, the container must be properly labeled with the contents and the date it was mixed. All concentrated disinfectants must be diluted exactly as instructed by the manufacturer on the container’s label. 

Decontamination Method 2 also has two steps: cleaning and sterilizing. The word sterilize is often used incorrectly. Sterilization is the Process that completely destroys all microbial life, including spores. The most effective methods of sterilization use high-pressure steam equipment called autoclaves. Simply exposing instruments to steam is not enough. To be effective against disease-causing pathogens, the steam must be pressurized in an autoclave so that the steam penetrates the spore coats of the spore-forming bacteria. Dry heat forms of sterilization are less efficient and require longer times at higher temperatures. Dry heat sterilization is not recommended for use in salons. Most people without medical training do not understand how to use an autoclave. For example, dirty implements cannot be properly sterilized without first being properly 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Term

066) The level of decontamination required in the

salon / spa is:

A) Antiseptic

B) Sanitation

 C) disinfection 

D) Sterlization

Definition

                           DISINFECTION        

From the highest to lowest, the levels of Decontamination are:            STERLIZATION...DISINFECTION...SANITATION

SANITATION

also known as sanitizing; a chemical process of reducing the number of disease-causing germs on cleaned surfaces to a safe level

1. To eliminate contamination in. 

2. To make safe by eliminating poisonous or otherwise harmful substances, such as noxious chemicals or radioactive material.

Disinfection 

is the process that eliminates most, but not necessarily all, microorganisms on nonliving surfaces. This process is not effective against bacterial spores. In the salon setting, disinfection is extremely effective in controlling microorganisms on surfaces such as shears, nippers, and other multiuse tools and equipment

STERILIZATION

Sterilization is the process that completely destroys all microbial life, including spores. The most effective methods of sterilization use high-pressure steam equipment called autoclaves. Simply exposing instruments to steam is not enough. To be effective against disease-causing pathogens, the steam must be pressurized in an autoclave so that the steam penetrates the spore coats of the spore-forming bacteria. Dry heat forms of sterilization are less efficient and require longer times at higher temperatures. Dry heat sterilization is not recommended for use in salons

Decontamination Method 1 has two steps: cleaning and disinfecting. Remember that when you clean, you must remove all visible dirt and debris from tools, implements, and equipment by washing with liquid soap and warm water and by using a clean and disinfected nail brush to scrub any grooved or hinged portions of the item. A surface is properly cleaned when the number of contaminants on the surface is greatly reduced. In turn, this reduces the risk of infection. The vast majority of contaminants and pathogens can be removed from the surfaces of tools and implements through proper cleaning. This is why cleaning is an important part of disinfecting tools and equipment. A surface must be properly cleaned before it can be properly disinfected. Using a disinfectant without cleaning first is like using mouthwash without brushing your teeth—it just does not work properly! Cleaned surfaces can still harbor small amounts of pathogens, but the presence of fewer pathogens means infections are less likely to be spread. Putting antiseptics on your skin or washing your hands with soap and water will drastically lower the number of pathogens on your hands. However, it does not clean them properly. The proper cleaning of the hands requires rubbing hands together and using liquid soap, warm running water, a nail brush, and a clean towel. Do not underestimate the importance of proper cleaning and hand washing. They are the most powerful and important ways to prevent the spread of infection.

There are three ways to clean your tools or implements:

• Washing with soap and warm water, then scrubbing them with  a clean and properly disinfected nail brush. 

• Using an ultrasonic unit.

• Using a cleaning solvent (e.g., on metal bits for electric files).

The second step of Decontamination Method 1 is disinfection. Remember that disinfection is the process that eliminates most, but not necessarily all, microorganisms on nonliving surfaces. This process is not effective against bacterial spores. In the salon setting, disinfection is extremely effective in controlling microorganisms on surfaces such as shears, nippers, and other multiuse tools and equipment. Remember that disinfectants are products that destroy all bacteria, fungi, and viruses (but not spores) on surfaces. Disinfectants are not for use on human skin, hair, or nails. All disinfectants clearly state on the label that you should avoid skin contact. This means avoid contact with your skin as well as the client’s. Do not put your fingers directly into any disinfecting solution.  If you mix a disinfectant in a container that is not labeled by the manufacturer, the container must be properly labeled with the contents and the date it was mixed. All concentrated disinfectants must be diluted exactly as instructed by the manufacturer on the container’s label. 

Decontamination Method 2 also has two steps: cleaning and sterilizing. The word sterilize is often used incorrectly. Sterilization is the Process that completely destroys all microbial life, including spores. The most effective methods of sterilization use high-pressure steam equipment called autoclaves. Simply exposing instruments to steam is not enough. To be effective against disease-causing pathogens, the steam must be pressurized in an autoclave so that the steam penetrates the spore coats of the spore-forming bacteria. Dry heat forms of sterilization are less efficient and require longer times at higher temperatures. Dry heat sterilization is not recommended for use in salons. Most people without medical training do not understand how to use an autoclave. For example, dirty implements cannot be properly sterilized without first being properly 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Term

085) What is the Quats mixing ratio and the suggested immersion time: 

A) 1:1,0000 and 5 minutes

B) 1:1,5000 and 10 minutes

C) 1:1,0000 and over the weekend

D) 1:1,0000 and 10 minutes

Definition


1:1000 and 10 minutes 

Quaternary ammonium compounds

(KWAT-ur-nayr-ree uh-MOH-neeum KAHM-powndz), also known as quats (KWATZ), are disinfectants that are very effective when used properly in the salon. The most advanced type of these formulations is called multiple quats. Multiple quats contain sophisticated blends of quats that work together to dramatically increase the effectiveness of these disinfectants. Quat solutions usually disinfect implements in ten minutes. These formulas may contain anti-rust ingredients, so leaving tools in the solution for prolonged periods can cause dulling or damage. They should be removed from the solution after the specified period, rinsed (if required), dried, and stored  in a clean, covered container.

 

 

Term

088) What should you do if a blood spill occurs: 

A) Stop service

B) Continue service

C) Decide whose fault it is

D) Look for someone to blame

Definition
Stop service
Term

089) A black light that enables the practitioner using it to observe problems not visible to the naked eye, including dry patches, oily areas, pigmentation problems, and bacteria-among others:

A) Black Light

B) Wood's Lamp

C) HalogenLamp

D) Fitzpatrick Lamp

Definition

WOOD'S LAMP

The Woods Lamp exposes conditions that are not visible to the naked eye!

Term

091) Tinea is the medical term for this problem:

A) Sabies

B) Itch Mite

C) Lice

D) Ringworm

Definition

RINGWORM

Tinea (TIN-ee-uh) is the technical term for ringworm. It is characterized by itching, scales, and, sometimes, painful circular lesions. Several patches may be present at one time. Tinea is caused by a fungal organism and not a parasite, as the old-fashioned term ringworm seems to suggest. All forms of tinea are contagious and can be easily transmitted from one person to another. Infected skin scales or hairs that contain the fungi are known to spread the disease. Bathtubs, swimming pools, and uncleaned personal articles are also sources of transmission. Practicing approved cleaning and disinfection procedures will help prevent the spread of this disease in the salon.

"Athletes Foot, Jock Itch and Ringworm". Cleveland Clinic. Retrieved 2012-07-25. "Ringworm is a skin rash caused by a fungus; it is not caused by a worm. (Fungus is a plant-like structure.) Health care providers call ringworm "tinea." "Athlete's foot" (tinea pedis) and "jock itch" (tinea cruris) are types of ringworm."

 

 

Term

092) Tinea Capitis is the medical term for this problem: 

A) Ringworm

B) Athlete's Feet

C) Ringworm of the feet

D) Ringworm or the head

Definition

[image]

RINGWORD OF THE HEAD

Tinea capitis is another type of fungal infection characterized by red papules, or spots, at the opening of the hair follicles The patches spread, and the hair becomes brittle. Hair often breaks off, leaving only a stump, or the hair may be shed from the enlarged open follicle.

Term

115) Type of bacteria that lives on dead matter and does not produce disease:

A) Parasites/Pathogenic Bacteria

B) Saprophytes/non-pathogenic

C) Fungi

D) MRSA/Methicillin Resistant Staphyloccus Aureus

Definition

SAPROPHYTES / NONPATHOGENIC

sap·ro·phyte (spr-ft) n. An organism, especially a fungus or bacterium that grows on and derives its nourishment from dead or decaying organic matter. 

Parasites: Parasites are organisms that grow, feed, and shelter on or in another organism (referred to as a host), while contributing nothing to the survival of that organism. They must have a host to survive. Parasites can live on or inside of humans and animals. They also can be found in food, on plants and trees, and in water. Humans can acquire internal parasites by eating fish or meat that has not been properly cooked. External parasites that affect humans on or in the skin include ticks, fleas, and mites. Head lice are a type of parasite responsible for contagious diseases and conditions (Figure 5–9). One condition caused by an infestation of head lice is called pediculosis capitis (puh-dik-yuh-LOH-sis KAP-ih-tus). Scabies (SKAY-beez) is also a contagious skin disease and is caused by the itch mite, which burrows under the skin contagious diseases, such as ringworm

There are thousands of different kinds of bacteria that fall into two primary types: 

pathogenic and nonpathogenic.

nonpathogenic (non-path-uh-JEN-ik); in other words, they are harmless organisms that may perform useful functions. They are safe to come in contact with since they do not cause disease or harm. For example, nonpathogenic bacteria are used to make yogurt, cheese, and some medicines. In the human body, nonpathogenic bacteria help the body break down food and protect against infection. They also stimulate the immune system.

Pathogenic (path-uh-JEN-ik) bacteria are harmful microorganisms that can cause disease or infection in humans when they invade the body. Salons and schools must maintain strict standards for cleaning and disinfecting at all times to prevent the spread of pathogenic microorganisms.

 

 

Term

116) Type of bacteria that lives on live matter and does produce disease: 

A) Parasites / Pathogenic Bacteria

B) Saprophytes / non-pathogenic

C) Fungi

D) MRSA/Methicillin Resistant Staphyloccus Aureus

Definition

PARASITES / PATHOGENIC BACTERIA

 

Parasites: Parasites are organisms that grow, feed, and shelter on or in another organism (referred to as a host), while contributing nothing to the survival of that organism. They must have a host to survive. Parasites can live on or inside of humans and animals. They also can be found in food, on plants and trees, and in water. Humans can acquire internal parasites by eating fish or meat that has not been properly cooked. External parasites that affect humans on or in the skin include ticks, fleas, and mites. Head lice are a type of parasite responsible for contagious diseases and conditions (Figure 5–9). One condition caused by an infestation of head lice is called pediculosis capitis (puh-dik-yuh-LOH-sis KAP-ih-tus). Scabies (SKAY-beez) is also a contagious skin disease and is caused by the itch mite, which burrows under the skin contagious diseases, such as ringworm

sap·ro·phyte (spr-ft) n. An organism, especially a fungus or bacterium that grows on and derives its nourishment from dead or decaying organic matter. 

There are thousands of different kinds of bacteria that fall into two primary types: 

pathogenic and nonpathogenic.

Pathogenic (path-uh-JEN-ik) bacteria are harmful microorganisms that can cause disease or infection in humans when they invade the body. Salons and schools must maintain strict standards for cleaning and disinfecting at all times to prevent the spread of pathogenic microorganisms.

nonpathogenic (non-path-uh-JEN-ik); in other words, they are harmless organisms that may perform useful functions. They are safe to come in contact with since they do not cause disease or harm. For example, nonpathogenic bacteria are used to make yogurt, cheese, and some medicines. In the human body, nonpathogenic bacteria help the body break down food and protect against infection. They also stimulate the immune system.

 

 

 

Term

117) A type of infectious staph bacteria highly resistant to conventional treatments such as antibiotics: 

A) Parasites/Pathogenic Bacteria

B) Saprophytes/non-pathogenic

C) Fungi

D) MRSA/Methicillin Resistant Staphyloccus Aureus

Definition


MRSA/METHICILLIN RESISTANT STAPHYLOCCUS AUREUS

(MRSA) 

(METH-eh-sill-en _ ree-ZIST-ent _ staf-uh-loh-KOK-us _ OR-ee-us) is  type of staph bacteria that is resistant to certain antibiotics  called beta-lactams. These antibiotics include methicillin and other more common antibiotics such as oxacillin, penicillin, and amoxicillin. In the community, most MRSA infections are skin infections. Staph is responsible for food poisoning and a wide Range of diseases, including toxic shock syndrome. Some types of infectious staph bacteria are highly resistant to conventional treatments such as antibiotics. An example is the staph infection called methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) (METH-eh-sill-en _ ree-ZIST-ent _ staf-uh-loh-KOK _ us OR-ee-us). Historically, MRSA occurred most frequently among persons with weakened immune systems or among people who had undergone medical procedures. Today, it has become more common in otherwise healthy people. Clients who appear completely healthy may bring this organism into the salon where it can infect others. Some people carry the bacteria and are not even aware of their infection, but the people they infect may show more obvious symptoms. MRSA initially appears as a skin infection, such as pimples, rashes, and boils that can be difficult to cure. Without proper treatment, the infection becomes systemic and can have devastating consequences that can result in death.

Term

118) Pus forming bacteria that causes abscesses, pustules, and boils they grow like clusters of grapes: 

A) Streptococci

B) Staphylococci

C) Bacilli

D) Diplococci

Definition

[image]

STAPHYLOCICCI

 Staphylococci (staf-uh-loh-KOK-sy) are pus-forming bacteria that grow in clusters like bunches of grapes. They cause abscesses, pustules, and boils . Some types of staphylococci (or staph as many call it) may not cause infections in healthy humans.

Term

153) level of decontamination you should use on hands prior to meeting a client: 

A) Antiseptic

B) Sanitation

C) Disinfection

D) Sterilization

Definition

SANITATION

From the highest to lowest, the levels of Decontamination are:

STERLIZATION...DISINFECTION...SANITATION

SANITATION

also known as sanitizing; a chemical process of reducing the number of disease-causing germs on cleaned surfaces to a safe level

1. To eliminate contamination in. 

2. To make safe by eliminating poisonous or otherwise harmful substances, such as noxious chemicals or radioactive material.

Disinfection 

is the process that eliminates most, but not necessarily all, microorganisms on nonliving surfaces. This process is not effective against bacterial spores. In the salon setting, disinfection is extremely effective in controlling microorganisms on surfaces such as shears, nippers, and other multiuse tools and equipment

STERILIZATION

Sterilization is the process that completely destroys all microbial life, including spores. The most effective methods of sterilization use high-pressure steam equipment called autoclaves. Simply exposing instruments to steam is not enough. To be effective against disease-causing pathogens, the steam must be pressurized in an autoclave so that the steam penetrates the spore coats of the spore-forming bacteria. Dry heat forms of sterilization are less efficient and require longer times at higher temperatures. Dry heat sterilization is not recommended for use in salons

Decontamination Method 1 has two steps: cleaning and disinfecting. Remember that when you clean, you must remove all visible dirt and debris from tools, implements, and equipment by washing with liquid soap and warm water and by using a clean and disinfected nail brush to scrub any grooved or hinged portions of the item. A surface is properly cleaned when the number of contaminants on the surface is greatly reduced. In turn, this reduces the risk of infection. The vast majority of contaminants and pathogens can be removed from the surfaces of tools and implements through proper cleaning. This is why cleaning is an important part of disinfecting tools and equipment. A surface must be properly cleaned before it can be properly disinfected. Using a disinfectant without cleaning first is like using mouthwash without brushing your teeth—it just does not work properly! Cleaned surfaces can still harbor small amounts of pathogens, but the presence of fewer pathogens means infections are less likely to be spread. Putting antiseptics on your skin or washing your hands with soap and water will drastically lower the number of pathogens on your hands. However, it does not clean them properly. The proper cleaning of the hands requires rubbing hands together and using liquid soap, warm running water, a nail brush, and a clean towel. Do not underestimate the importance of proper cleaning and hand washing. They are the most powerful and important ways to prevent the spread of infection.

There are three ways to clean your tools or implements:

• Washing with soap and warm water, then scrubbing them with  a clean and properly disinfected nail brush. 

• Using an ultrasonic unit.

• Using a cleaning solvent (e.g., on metal bits for electric files).

The second step of Decontamination Method 1 is disinfection. Remember that disinfection is the process that eliminates most, but not necessarily all, microorganisms on nonliving surfaces. This process is not effective against bacterial spores. In the salon setting, disinfection is extremely effective in controlling microorganisms on surfaces such as shears, nippers, and other multiuse tools and equipment. Remember that disinfectants are products that destroy all bacteria, fungi, and viruses (but not spores) on surfaces. Disinfectants are not for use on human skin, hair, or nails. All disinfectants clearly state on the label that you should avoid skin contact. This means avoid contact with your skin as well as the client’s. Do not put your fingers directly into any disinfecting solution.  If you mix a disinfectant in a container that is not labeled by the manufacturer, the container must be properly labeled with the contents and the date it was mixed. All concentrated disinfectants must be diluted exactly as instructed by the manufacturer on the container’s label. 

Decontamination Method 2 also has two steps: cleaning and sterilizing. The word sterilize is often used incorrectly. Sterilization is the Process that completely destroys all microbial life, including spores. The most effective methods of sterilization use high-pressure steam equipment called autoclaves. Simply exposing instruments to steam is not enough. To be effective against disease-causing pathogens, the steam must be pressurized in an autoclave so that the steam penetrates the spore coats of the spore-forming bacteria. Dry heat forms of sterilization are less efficient and require longer times at higher temperatures. Dry heat sterilization is not recommended for use in salons. Most people without medical training do not understand how to use an autoclave. For example, dirty implements cannot be properly sterilized without first being properly STERILIZATION

Sterilization is the process that completely destroys all microbial life, including spores. The most effective methods of sterilization use high-pressure steam equipment called autoclaves. Simply exposing instruments to steam is not enough. To be effective against disease-causing pathogens, the steam must be pressurized in an autoclave so that the steam penetrates the spore coats of the spore-forming bacteria. Dry heat forms of sterilization are less efficient and require longer times at higher temperatures. Dry heat sterilization is not recommended for use in salons.

 

 

 

Term

154) A contagious animal parasite often called the "itch Mite":   

A) Tinea

B) Pediculosis

C) Scabies

D) Langerhans Cells

Definition

SCABIES

Scabies (SKAY-beez) is also a contagious skin disease and is caused by the itch mite, which burrows under the skin. Contagious diseases and conditions caused by parasites should only be treated by a doctor. 

Term

155) A highly contagious animal parasite often called lice: 

A) Sabies

B) Tine Prdis

C) Pediculosis

D) Langerhans Cells

Definition

[image]

PEDICULOSIS

Pediculosis capitis (puh-dik-yuh-LOH-sis _ KAP-ih-tis) is the infestation of the hair and scalp with head lice. As these parasites feed on the scalp, it begins to itch. If the scalp is scratched, it can cause an infection. Head lice are transmitted from one person to another by contact with infested hats, combs, brushes, and other personal articles. You can distinguish head lice from dandruff flakes by looking closely at the scalp with a magnifying glass.

 

Term

156) A highly contagious animal parasite often called "Ringworm":

A) Scabies

B) Lice

C) Pediculosis

D) Tinea

Definition


TINEA

Tinea (TIN-ee-uh) is the technical term for ringworm. It is characterized by itching, scales, and, sometimes, painful circular lesions. Several patches may be present at one time. Tinea is caused by a fungal organism and not a parasite, as the old-fashioned term ringworm seems to suggest. All forms of tinea are contagious and can be easily transmitted from one person to another. Infected skin scales or hairs that contain the fungi are known to spread the disease. Bathtubs, swimming pools, and uncleaned personal articles are also sources of transmission. Practicing approved cleaning and disinfection procedures will help prevent the spread of this disease in the salon.

 

 

 

Term

157) When Ringworm appears on the feet, it is refered to as:

A) Athletes feet

B) Tinea Capitis

C)  Tinea Pedis

D)A and C

Definition

[image]

TINEA PEDIS

Athletes feet

Tinea pedis (TIN-ee-uh PED-us) is the medical term for fungal infections of the feet. These infections can occur on the bottoms of the feet and often appear as a red itchy rash in the spaces between the toes, most often between the fourth and fifth toe. There is sometimes a small degree of scaling of the skin. Clients with this condition should be advised to wash their feet every day and dry them completely. This will make it difficult for the infection to live or grow. Advise clients to wear cotton socks and change them at least twice per day. They should also avoid wearing the same pair of shoes each day, since shoes can take up to twenty-four hours to completely dry. Over-the-counter antifungal powders can help keep feet dry and may help speed healing.

"Athletes Foot, Jock Itch and Ringworm". Cleveland Clinic. Retrieved 2012-07-25. "Ringworm is a skin rash caused by a fungus; it is not caused by a worm. (Fungus is a plant-like structure.) Health care providers call ringworm "tinea." "Athlete's foot" (tinea pedis) and "jock itch" (tinea cruris) are types of ringworm."

 

 

Term

164) This is the lowest level of decontamination:

A) Antiseptic

B) Sanitation

C) Disinfection

D) Sterilization

 

Definition

SANITATION

From the highest to lowest, the levels of Decontamination are:

STERLIZATION...DISINFECTION...SANITATION

SANITATION

also known as sanitizing; a chemical process of reducing the number of disease-causing germs on cleaned surfaces to a safe level

1. To eliminate contamination in. 

2. To make safe by eliminating poisonous or otherwise harmful substances, such as noxious chemicals or radioactive material.

Disinfection 

is the process that eliminates most, but not necessarily all, microorganisms on nonliving surfaces. This process is not effective against bacterial spores. In the salon setting, disinfection is extremely effective in controlling microorganisms on surfaces such as shears, nippers, and other multiuse tools and equipment

STERILIZATION

Sterilization is the process that completely destroys all microbial life, including spores. The most effective methods of sterilization use high-pressure steam equipment called autoclaves. Simply exposing instruments to steam is not enough. To be effective against disease-causing pathogens, the steam must be pressurized in an autoclave so that the steam penetrates the spore coats of the spore-forming bacteria. Dry heat forms of sterilization are less efficient and require longer times at higher temperatures. Dry heat sterilization is not recommended for use in salons

Decontamination Method 1 has two steps: cleaning and disinfecting. Remember that when you clean, you must remove all visible dirt and debris from tools, implements, and equipment by washing with liquid soap and warm water and by using a clean and disinfected nail brush to scrub any grooved or hinged portions of the item. A surface is properly cleaned when the number of contaminants on the surface is greatly reduced. In turn, this reduces the risk of infection. The vast majority of contaminants and pathogens can be removed from the surfaces of tools and implements through proper cleaning. This is why cleaning is an important part of disinfecting tools and equipment. A surface must be properly cleaned before it can be properly disinfected. Using a disinfectant without cleaning first is like using mouthwash without brushing your teeth—it just does not work properly! Cleaned surfaces can still harbor small amounts of pathogens, but the presence of fewer pathogens means infections are less likely to be spread. Putting antiseptics on your skin or washing your hands with soap and water will drastically lower the number of pathogens on your hands. However, it does not clean them properly. The proper cleaning of the hands requires rubbing hands together and using liquid soap, warm running water, a nail brush, and a clean towel. Do not underestimate the importance of proper cleaning and hand washing. They are the most powerful and important ways to prevent the spread of infection.

There are three ways to clean your tools or implements:

• Washing with soap and warm water, then scrubbing them with  a clean and properly disinfected nail brush. 

• Using an ultrasonic unit.

• Using a cleaning solvent (e.g., on metal bits for electric files).

The second step of Decontamination Method 1 is disinfection. Remember that disinfection is the process that eliminates most, but not necessarily all, microorganisms on nonliving surfaces. This process is not effective against bacterial spores. In the salon setting, disinfection is extremely effective in controlling microorganisms on surfaces such as shears, nippers, and other multiuse tools and equipment. Remember that disinfectants are products that destroy all bacteria, fungi, and viruses (but not spores) on surfaces. Disinfectants are not for use on human skin, hair, or nails. All disinfectants clearly state on the label that you should avoid skin contact. This means avoid contact with your skin as well as the client’s. Do not put your fingers directly into any disinfecting solution.  If you mix a disinfectant in a container that is not labeled by the manufacturer, the container must be properly labeled with the contents and the date it was mixed. All concentrated disinfectants must be diluted exactly as instructed by the manufacturer on the container’s label. 

Decontamination Method 2 also has two steps: cleaning and sterilizing. The word sterilize is often used incorrectly. Sterilization is the Process that completely destroys all microbial life, including spores. The most effective methods of sterilization use high-pressure steam equipment called autoclaves. Simply exposing instruments to steam is not enough. To be effective against disease-causing pathogens, the steam must be pressurized in an autoclave so that the steam penetrates the spore coats of the spore-forming bacteria. Dry heat forms of sterilization are less efficient and require longer times at higher temperatures. Dry heat sterilization is not recommended for use in salons. Most people without medical training do not understand how to use an autoclave. For example, dirty implements cannot be properly sterilized without first being properly STERILIZATION

Sterilization is the process that completely destroys all microbial life, including spores. The most effective methods of sterilization use high-pressure steam equipment called autoclaves. Simply exposing instruments to steam is not enough. To be effective against disease-causing pathogens, the steam must be pressurized in an autoclave so that the steam penetrates the spore coats of the spore-forming bacteria. Dry heat forms of sterilization are less efficient and require longer times at higher temperatures. Dry heat sterilization is not recommended for use in salons.

 

 

 

 

Term

165)  This is the highest level of decontamination:

A) Antiseptic

B) Sanitation

C) Disinfection

D) Sterilization

 

Definition

Sterilization


From the highest to lowest, the levels of Decontamination are:

STERLIZATION...DISINFECTION...SANITATION

STERILIZATION

 Sterilization is the process that completely destroys all microbial life, including spores. The most effective methods of sterilization use high-pressure steam equipment called autoclaves. Simply exposing instruments to steam is not enough. To be effective against disease-causing pathogens, the steam must be pressurized in an autoclave so that the steam penetrates the spore coats of the spore-forming bacteria. Dry heat forms of sterilization are less efficient and require longer times at higher temperatures. Dry heat sterilization is not recommended for use in salons

Sanitation 

 

also known as sanitizing; a chemical process of reducing the number of disease-causing germs on cleaned surfaces to a safe level

1. To eliminate contamination in. 

2. To make safe by eliminating poisonous or otherwise harmful substances, such as noxious chemicals or radioactive material.

Disinfection 

is the process that eliminates most, but not necessarily all, microorganisms on nonliving surfaces. This process is not effective against bacterial spores. In the salon setting, disinfection is extremely effective in controlling microorganisms on surfaces such as shears, nippers, and other multiuse tools and equipment 

Decontamination Method 1 has two steps: cleaning and disinfecting. Remember that when you clean, you must remove all visible dirt and debris from tools, implements, and equipment by washing with liquid soap and warm water and by using a clean and disinfected nail brush to scrub any grooved or hinged portions of the item. A surface is properly cleaned when the number of contaminants on the surface is greatly reduced. In turn, this reduces the risk of infection. The vast majority of contaminants and pathogens can be removed from the surfaces of tools and implements through proper cleaning. This is why cleaning is an important part of disinfecting tools and equipment. A surface must be properly cleaned before it can be properly disinfected. Using a disinfectant without cleaning first is like using mouthwash without brushing your teeth—it just does not work properly! Cleaned surfaces can still harbor small amounts of pathogens, but the presence of fewer pathogens means infections are less likely to be spread. Putting antiseptics on your skin or washing your hands with soap and water will drastically lower the number of pathogens on your hands. However, it does not clean them properly. The proper cleaning of the hands requires rubbing hands together and using liquid soap, warm running water, a nail brush, and a clean towel. Do not underestimate the importance of proper cleaning and hand washing. They are the most powerful and important ways to prevent the spread of infection.

There are three ways to clean your tools or implements:

• Washing with soap and warm water, then scrubbing them with  a clean and properly disinfected nail brush. 

• Using an ultrasonic unit.

• Using a cleaning solvent (e.g., on metal bits for electric files).

The second step of Decontamination Method 1 is disinfection. Remember that disinfection is the process that eliminates most, but not necessarily all, microorganisms on nonliving surfaces. This process is not effective against bacterial spores. In the salon setting, disinfection is extremely effective in controlling microorganisms on surfaces such as shears, nippers, and other multiuse tools and equipment. Remember that disinfectants are products that destroy all bacteria, fungi, and viruses (but not spores) on surfaces. Disinfectants are not for use on human skin, hair, or nails. All disinfectants clearly state on the label that you should avoid skin contact. This means avoid contact with your skin as well as the client’s. Do not put your fingers directly into any disinfecting solution.  If you mix a disinfectant in a container that is not labeled by the manufacturer, the container must be properly labeled with the contents and the date it was mixed. All concentrated disinfectants must be diluted exactly as instructed by the manufacturer on the container’s label. 

Decontamination Method 2 also has two steps: cleaning and sterilizing. The word sterilize is often used incorrectly. Sterilization is the Process that completely destroys all microbial life, including spores. The most effective methods of sterilization use high-pressure steam equipment called autoclaves. Simply exposing instruments to steam is not enough. To be effective against disease-causing pathogens, the steam must be pressurized in an autoclave so that the steam penetrates the spore coats of the spore-forming bacteria. Dry heat forms of sterilization are less efficient and require longer times at higher temperatures. Dry heat sterilization is not recommended for use in salons. Most people without medical training do not understand how to use an autoclave. For example, dirty implements cannot be properly sterilized without first being properly STERILIZATION

Sterilization is the process that completely destroys all microbial life, including spores. The most effective methods of sterilization use high-pressure steam equipment called autoclaves. Simply exposing instruments to steam is not enough. To be effective against disease-causing pathogens, the steam must be pressurized in an autoclave so that the steam penetrates the spore coats of the spore-forming bacteria. Dry heat forms of sterilization are less efficient and require longer times at higher temperatures. Dry heat sterilization is not recommended for use in salons.

 

 

 

 

Term

166) This is the level of decontamination required in medical settings:

A) Antiseptic

B) Sanitation

C) Disinfection

D) Sterilization

 

Definition

Sterilization


From the highest to lowest, the levels of Decontamination are:

STERLIZATION...DISINFECTION...SANITATION

STERILIZATION 

Sterilization is the process that completely destroys all microbial life, including spores. The most effective methods of sterilization use high-pressure steam equipment called autoclaves. Simply exposing instruments to steam is not enough. To be effective against disease-causing pathogens, the steam must be pressurized in an autoclave so that the steam penetrates the spore coats of the spore-forming bacteria. Dry heat forms of sterilization are less efficient and require longer times at higher temperatures. Dry heat sterilization is not recommended for use in salons

Sanitation 

 

also known as sanitizing; a chemical process of reducing the number of disease-causing germs on cleaned surfaces to a safe level

1. To eliminate contamination in. 

2. To make safe by eliminating poisonous or otherwise harmful substances, such as noxious chemicals or radioactive material.

Disinfection 

is the process that eliminates most, but not necessarily all, microorganisms on nonliving surfaces. This process is not effective against bacterial spores. In the salon setting, disinfection is extremely effective in controlling microorganisms on surfaces such as shears, nippers, and other multiuse tools and equipment 

Decontamination Method 1 has two steps: cleaning and disinfecting. Remember that when you clean, you must remove all visible dirt and debris from tools, implements, and equipment by washing with liquid soap and warm water and by using a clean and disinfected nail brush to scrub any grooved or hinged portions of the item. A surface is properly cleaned when the number of contaminants on the surface is greatly reduced. In turn, this reduces the risk of infection. The vast majority of contaminants and pathogens can be removed from the surfaces of tools and implements through proper cleaning. This is why cleaning is an important part of disinfecting tools and equipment. A surface must be properly cleaned before it can be properly disinfected. Using a disinfectant without cleaning first is like using mouthwash without brushing your teeth—it just does not work properly! Cleaned surfaces can still harbor small amounts of pathogens, but the presence of fewer pathogens means infections are less likely to be spread. Putting antiseptics on your skin or washing your hands with soap and water will drastically lower the number of pathogens on your hands. However, it does not clean them properly. The proper cleaning of the hands requires rubbing hands together and using liquid soap, warm running water, a nail brush, and a clean towel. Do not underestimate the importance of proper cleaning and hand washing. They are the most powerful and important ways to prevent the spread of infection.

There are three ways to clean your tools or implements:

• Washing with soap and warm water, then scrubbing them with  a clean and properly disinfected nail brush. 

• Using an ultrasonic unit.

• Using a cleaning solvent (e.g., on metal bits for electric files).

The second step of Decontamination Method 1 is disinfection. Remember that disinfection is the process that eliminates most, but not necessarily all, microorganisms on nonliving surfaces. This process is not effective against bacterial spores. In the salon setting, disinfection is extremely effective in controlling microorganisms on surfaces such as shears, nippers, and other multiuse tools and equipment. Remember that disinfectants are products that destroy all bacteria, fungi, and viruses (but not spores) on surfaces. Disinfectants are not for use on human skin, hair, or nails. All disinfectants clearly state on the label that you should avoid skin contact. This means avoid contact with your skin as well as the client’s. Do not put your fingers directly into any disinfecting solution.  If you mix a disinfectant in a container that is not labeled by the manufacturer, the container must be properly labeled with the contents and the date it was mixed. All concentrated disinfectants must be diluted exactly as instructed by the manufacturer on the container’s label. 

Decontamination Method 2 also has two steps: cleaning and sterilizing. The word sterilize is often used incorrectly. Sterilization is the Process that completely destroys all microbial life, including spores. The most effective methods of sterilization use high-pressure steam equipment called autoclaves. Simply exposing instruments to steam is not enough. To be effective against disease-causing pathogens, the steam must be pressurized in an autoclave so that the steam penetrates the spore coats of the spore-forming bacteria. Dry heat forms of sterilization are less efficient and require longer times at higher temperatures. Dry heat sterilization is not recommended for use in salons. Most people without medical training do not understand how to use an autoclave. For example, dirty implements cannot be properly sterilized without first being properly STERILIZATION

Sterilization is the process that completely destroys all microbial life, including spores. The most effective methods of sterilization use high-pressure steam equipment called autoclaves. Simply exposing instruments to steam is not enough. To be effective against disease-causing pathogens, the steam must be pressurized in an autoclave so that the steam penetrates the spore coats of the spore-forming bacteria. Dry heat forms of sterilization are less efficient and require longer times at higher temperatures. Dry heat sterilization is not recommended for use in salons.

 

 

 

 

Term

167) This is the level of decontamination required in salons / spa: 

A) Antiseptic

B) Sanitation

C) Disinfection

D) Sterilization

Definition

DISINFECTION


From the highest to lowest, the levels of Decontamination are:

STERLIZATION...DISINFECTION...SANITATION

Disinfection  

is the process that eliminates most, but not necessarily all, microorganisms on nonliving surfaces. This process is not effective against bacterial spores. In the salon setting, disinfection is extremely effective in controlling microorganisms on surfaces such as shears, nippers, and other multiuse tools and equipment 

STERILIZATION 

Sterilization is the process that completely destroys all microbial life, including spores. The most effective methods of sterilization use high-pressure steam equipment called autoclaves. Simply exposing instruments to steam is not enough. To be effective against disease-causing pathogens, the steam must be pressurized in an autoclave so that the steam penetrates the spore coats of the spore-forming bacteria. Dry heat forms of sterilization are less efficient and require longer times at higher temperatures. Dry heat sterilization is not recommended for use in salons

Sanitation 

 

also known as sanitizing; a chemical process of reducing the number of disease-causing germs on cleaned surfaces to a safe level

1. To eliminate contamination in. 

2. To make safe by eliminating poisonous or otherwise harmful substances, such as noxious chemicals or radioactive material.

 

Decontamination Method 1 has two steps: cleaning and disinfecting. Remember that when you clean, you must remove all visible dirt and debris from tools, implements, and equipment by washing with liquid soap and warm water and by using a clean and disinfected nail brush to scrub any grooved or hinged portions of the item. A surface is properly cleaned when the number of contaminants on the surface is greatly reduced. In turn, this reduces the risk of infection. The vast majority of contaminants and pathogens can be removed from the surfaces of tools and implements through proper cleaning. This is why cleaning is an important part of disinfecting tools and equipment. A surface must be properly cleaned before it can be properly disinfected. Using a disinfectant without cleaning first is like using mouthwash without brushing your teeth—it just does not work properly! Cleaned surfaces can still harbor small amounts of pathogens, but the presence of fewer pathogens means infections are less likely to be spread. Putting antiseptics on your skin or washing your hands with soap and water will drastically lower the number of pathogens on your hands. However, it does not clean them properly. The proper cleaning of the hands requires rubbing hands together and using liquid soap, warm running water, a nail brush, and a clean towel. Do not underestimate the importance of proper cleaning and hand washing. They are the most powerful and important ways to prevent the spread of infection.

There are three ways to clean your tools or implements:

• Washing with soap and warm water, then scrubbing them with  a clean and properly disinfected nail brush. 

• Using an ultrasonic unit.

• Using a cleaning solvent (e.g., on metal bits for electric files).

The second step of Decontamination Method 1 is disinfection. Remember that disinfection is the process that eliminates most, but not necessarily all, microorganisms on nonliving surfaces. This process is not effective against bacterial spores. In the salon setting, disinfection is extremely effective in controlling microorganisms on surfaces such as shears, nippers, and other multiuse tools and equipment. Remember that disinfectants are products that destroy all bacteria, fungi, and viruses (but not spores) on surfaces. Disinfectants are not for use on human skin, hair, or nails. All disinfectants clearly state on the label that you should avoid skin contact. This means avoid contact with your skin as well as the client’s. Do not put your fingers directly into any disinfecting solution.  If you mix a disinfectant in a container that is not labeled by the manufacturer, the container must be properly labeled with the contents and the date it was mixed. All concentrated disinfectants must be diluted exactly as instructed by the manufacturer on the container’s label. 

Decontamination Method 2 also has two steps: cleaning and sterilizing. The word sterilize is often used incorrectly. Sterilization is the Process that completely destroys all microbial life, including spores. The most effective methods of sterilization use high-pressure steam equipment called autoclaves. Simply exposing instruments to steam is not enough. To be effective against disease-causing pathogens, the steam must be pressurized in an autoclave so that the steam penetrates the spore coats of the spore-forming bacteria. Dry heat forms of sterilization are less efficient and require longer times at higher temperatures. Dry heat sterilization is not recommended for use in salons. Most people without medical training do not understand how to use an autoclave. For example, dirty implements cannot be properly sterilized without first being properly STERILIZATION

Sterilization is the process that completely destroys all microbial life, including spores. The most effective methods of sterilization use high-pressure steam equipment called autoclaves. Simply exposing instruments to steam is not enough. To be effective against disease-causing pathogens, the steam must be pressurized in an autoclave so that the steam penetrates the spore coats of the spore-forming bacteria. Dry heat forms of sterilization are less efficient and require longer times at higher temperatures. Dry heat sterilization is not recommended for use in salons.

 

 

 

 

Term

168) This is the level of decontamination required to destroy bacterial spores: 

A) Antiseptic

B) Sanitation

C) Disinfection

D) Sterilization

Definition

STERILIZATION

From the highest to lowest, the levels of Decontamination are:

STERLIZATION...DISINFECTION...SANITATION

STERILIZATION 

Sterilization is the process that completely destroys all microbial life, including spores. The most effective methods of sterilization use high-pressure steam equipment called autoclaves. Simply exposing instruments to steam is not enough. To be effective against disease-causing pathogens, the steam must be pressurized in an autoclave so that the steam penetrates the spore coats of the spore-forming bacteria. Dry heat forms of sterilization are less efficient and require longer times at higher temperatures. Dry heat sterilization is not recommended for use in salons

Sanitation 

 

also known as sanitizing; a chemical process of reducing the number of disease-causing germs on cleaned surfaces to a safe level

1. To eliminate contamination in. 

2. To make safe by eliminating poisonous or otherwise harmful substances, such as noxious chemicals or radioactive material.

 

 Disinfection  

is the process that eliminates most, but not necessarily all, microorganisms on nonliving surfaces. This process is not effective against bacterial spores. In the salon setting, disinfection is extremely effective in controlling microorganisms on surfaces such as shears, nippers, and other multiuse tools and equipment 

 

Decontamination Method 1 has two steps: cleaning and disinfecting. Remember that when you clean, you must remove all visible dirt and debris from tools, implements, and equipment by washing with liquid soap and warm water and by using a clean and disinfected nail brush to scrub any grooved or hinged portions of the item. A surface is properly cleaned when the number of contaminants on the surface is greatly reduced. In turn, this reduces the risk of infection. The vast majority of contaminants and pathogens can be removed from the surfaces of tools and implements through proper cleaning. This is why cleaning is an important part of disinfecting tools and equipment. A surface must be properly cleaned before it can be properly disinfected. Using a disinfectant without cleaning first is like using mouthwash without brushing your teeth—it just does not work properly! Cleaned surfaces can still harbor small amounts of pathogens, but the presence of fewer pathogens means infections are less likely to be spread. Putting antiseptics on your skin or washing your hands with soap and water will drastically lower the number of pathogens on your hands. However, it does not clean them properly. The proper cleaning of the hands requires rubbing hands together and using liquid soap, warm running water, a nail brush, and a clean towel. Do not underestimate the importance of proper cleaning and hand washing. They are the most powerful and important ways to prevent the spread of infection.

There are three ways to clean your tools or implements:

• Washing with soap and warm water, then scrubbing them with  a clean and properly disinfected nail brush. 

• Using an ultrasonic unit.

• Using a cleaning solvent (e.g., on metal bits for electric files).

The second step of Decontamination Method 1 is disinfection. Remember that disinfection is the process that eliminates most, but not necessarily all, microorganisms on nonliving surfaces. This process is not effective against bacterial spores. In the salon setting, disinfection is extremely effective in controlling microorganisms on surfaces such as shears, nippers, and other multiuse tools and equipment. Remember that disinfectants are products that destroy all bacteria, fungi, and viruses (but not spores) on surfaces. Disinfectants are not for use on human skin, hair, or nails. All disinfectants clearly state on the label that you should avoid skin contact. This means avoid contact with your skin as well as the client’s. Do not put your fingers directly into any disinfecting solution.  If you mix a disinfectant in a container that is not labeled by the manufacturer, the container must be properly labeled with the contents and the date it was mixed. All concentrated disinfectants must be diluted exactly as instructed by the manufacturer on the container’s label. 

Decontamination Method 2 also has two steps: cleaning and sterilizing. The word sterilize is often used incorrectly. Sterilization is the Process that completely destroys all microbial life, including spores. The most effective methods of sterilization use high-pressure steam equipment called autoclaves. Simply exposing instruments to steam is not enough. To be effective against disease-causing pathogens, the steam must be pressurized in an autoclave so that the steam penetrates the spore coats of the spore-forming bacteria. Dry heat forms of sterilization are less efficient and require longer times at higher temperatures. Dry heat sterilization is not recommended for use in salons. Most people without medical training do not understand how to use an autoclave. For example, dirty implements cannot be properly sterilized without first being properly STERILIZATION

Sterilization is the process that completely destroys all microbial life, including spores. The most effective methods of sterilization use high-pressure steam equipment called autoclaves. Simply exposing instruments to steam is not enough. To be effective against disease-causing pathogens, the steam must be pressurized in an autoclave so that the steam penetrates the spore coats of the spore-forming bacteria. Dry heat forms of sterilization are less efficient and require longer times at higher temperatures. Dry heat sterilization is not recommended for use in salons.

 

 

 

 

Term

215) Method of Decontamination used to slow down the spread of bacteria:

A) sterilization

B) Disinfection

C) Sanitation

D) Antiseption

Definition

SANITATION

From the highest to lowest, the levels of Decontamination are:

STERLIZATION...DISINFECTION...SANITATION

SANITATION

also known as sanitizing; a chemical process of reducing the number of disease-causing germs on cleaned surfaces to a safe level

1. To eliminate contamination in. 

2. To make safe by eliminating poisonous or otherwise harmful substances, such as noxious chemicals or radioactive material.

Disinfection 

is the process that eliminates most, but not necessarily all, microorganisms on nonliving surfaces. This process is not effective against bacterial spores. In the salon setting, disinfection is extremely effective in controlling microorganisms on surfaces such as shears, nippers, and other multiuse tools and equipment

STERILIZATION

Sterilization is the process that completely destroys all microbial life, including spores. The most effective methods of sterilization use high-pressure steam equipment called autoclaves. Simply exposing instruments to steam is not enough. To be effective against disease-causing pathogens, the steam must be pressurized in an autoclave so that the steam penetrates the spore coats of the spore-forming bacteria. Dry heat forms of sterilization are less efficient and require longer times at higher temperatures. Dry heat sterilization is not recommended for use in salons

Decontamination Method 1 has two steps: cleaning and disinfecting. Remember that when you clean, you must remove all visible dirt and debris from tools, implements, and equipment by washing with liquid soap and warm water and by using a clean and disinfected nail brush to scrub any grooved or hinged portions of the item. A surface is properly cleaned when the number of contaminants on the surface is greatly reduced. In turn, this reduces the risk of infection. The vast majority of contaminants and pathogens can be removed from the surfaces of tools and implements through proper cleaning. This is why cleaning is an important part of disinfecting tools and equipment. A surface must be properly cleaned before it can be properly disinfected. Using a disinfectant without cleaning first is like using mouthwash without brushing your teeth—it just does not work properly! Cleaned surfaces can still harbor small amounts of pathogens, but the presence of fewer pathogens means infections are less likely to be spread. Putting antiseptics on your skin or washing your hands with soap and water will drastically lower the number of pathogens on your hands. However, it does not clean them properly. The proper cleaning of the hands requires rubbing hands together and using liquid soap, warm running water, a nail brush, and a clean towel. Do not underestimate the importance of proper cleaning and hand washing. They are the most powerful and important ways to prevent the spread of infection.

There are three ways to clean your tools or implements:

• Washing with soap and warm water, then scrubbing them with  a clean and properly disinfected nail brush. 

• Using an ultrasonic unit.

• Using a cleaning solvent (e.g., on metal bits for electric files).

The second step of Decontamination Method 1 is disinfection. Remember that disinfection is the process that eliminates most, but not necessarily all, microorganisms on nonliving surfaces. This process is not effective against bacterial spores. In the salon setting, disinfection is extremely effective in controlling microorganisms on surfaces such as shears, nippers, and other multiuse tools and equipment. Remember that disinfectants are products that destroy all bacteria, fungi, and viruses (but not spores) on surfaces. Disinfectants are not for use on human skin, hair, or nails. All disinfectants clearly state on the label that you should avoid skin contact. This means avoid contact with your skin as well as the client’s. Do not put your fingers directly into any disinfecting solution.  If you mix a disinfectant in a container that is not labeled by the manufacturer, the container must be properly labeled with the contents and the date it was mixed. All concentrated disinfectants must be diluted exactly as instructed by the manufacturer on the container’s label. 

Decontamination Method 2 also has two steps: cleaning and sterilizing. The word sterilize is often used incorrectly. Sterilization is the Process that completely destroys all microbial life, including spores. The most effective methods of sterilization use high-pressure steam equipment called autoclaves. Simply exposing instruments to steam is not enough. To be effective against disease-causing pathogens, the steam must be pressurized in an autoclave so that the steam penetrates the spore coats of the spore-forming bacteria. Dry heat forms of sterilization are less efficient and require longer times at higher temperatures. Dry heat sterilization is not recommended for use in salons. Most people without medical training do not understand how to use an autoclave. For example, dirty implements cannot be properly sterilized without first being properly 

 

 

 

 

 

Term

266) Which will kill bacterial spores on a porous surface:

A) Sterilization

B) Disinfection

C) Sanitation

D) None of the above

Definition

NONE OF THE ABOVE


From the highest to lowest, the levels of Decontamination are:

STERLIZATION...DISINFECTION...SANITATION

SANITATION

also known as sanitizing; a chemical process of reducing the number of disease-causing germs on cleaned surfaces to a safe level

1. To eliminate contamination in. 

2. To make safe by eliminating poisonous or otherwise harmful substances, such as noxious chemicals or radioactive material.

Disinfection 

is the process that eliminates most, but not necessarily all, microorganisms on nonliving surfaces. This process is not effective against bacterial spores. In the salon setting, disinfection is extremely effective in controlling microorganisms on surfaces such as shears, nippers, and other multiuse tools and equipment

STERILIZATION

Sterilization is the process that completely destroys all microbial life, including spores. The most effective methods of sterilization use high-pressure steam equipment called autoclaves. Simply exposing instruments to steam is not enough. To be effective against disease-causing pathogens, the steam must be pressurized in an autoclave so that the steam penetrates the spore coats of the spore-forming bacteria. Dry heat forms of sterilization are less efficient and require longer times at higher temperatures. Dry heat sterilization is not recommended for use in salons

Decontamination Method 1 has two steps: cleaning and disinfecting. Remember that when you clean, you must remove all visible dirt and debris from tools, implements, and equipment by washing with liquid soap and warm water and by using a clean and disinfected nail brush to scrub any grooved or hinged portions of the item. A surface is properly cleaned when the number of contaminants on the surface is greatly reduced. In turn, this reduces the risk of infection. The vast majority of contaminants and pathogens can be removed from the surfaces of tools and implements through proper cleaning. This is why cleaning is an important part of disinfecting tools and equipment. A surface must be properly cleaned before it can be properly disinfected. Using a disinfectant without cleaning first is like using mouthwash without brushing your teeth—it just does not work properly! Cleaned surfaces can still harbor small amounts of pathogens, but the presence of fewer pathogens means infections are less likely to be spread. Putting antiseptics on your skin or washing your hands with soap and water will drastically lower the number of pathogens on your hands. However, it does not clean them properly. The proper cleaning of the hands requires rubbing hands together and using liquid soap, warm running water, a nail brush, and a clean towel. Do not underestimate the importance of proper cleaning and hand washing. They are the most powerful and important ways to prevent the spread of infection.

There are three ways to clean your tools or implements:

• Washing with soap and warm water, then scrubbing them with  a clean and properly disinfected nail brush. 

• Using an ultrasonic unit.

• Using a cleaning solvent (e.g., on metal bits for electric files).

The second step of Decontamination Method 1 is disinfection. Remember that disinfection is the process that eliminates most, but not necessarily all, microorganisms on nonliving surfaces. This process is not effective against bacterial spores. In the salon setting, disinfection is extremely effective in controlling microorganisms on surfaces such as shears, nippers, and other multiuse tools and equipment. Remember that disinfectants are products that destroy all bacteria, fungi, and viruses (but not spores) on surfaces. Disinfectants are not for use on human skin, hair, or nails. All disinfectants clearly state on the label that you should avoid skin contact. This means avoid contact with your skin as well as the client’s. Do not put your fingers directly into any disinfecting solution.  If you mix a disinfectant in a container that is not labeled by the manufacturer, the container must be properly labeled with the contents and the date it was mixed. All concentrated disinfectants must be diluted exactly as instructed by the manufacturer on the container’s label. 

Decontamination Method 2 also has two steps: cleaning and sterilizing. The word sterilize is often used incorrectly. Sterilization is the Process that completely destroys all microbial life, including spores. The most effective methods of sterilization use high-pressure steam equipment called autoclaves. Simply exposing instruments to steam is not enough. To be effective against disease-causing pathogens, the steam must be pressurized in an autoclave so that the steam penetrates the spore coats of the spore-forming bacteria. Dry heat forms of sterilization are less efficient and require longer times at higher temperatures. Dry heat sterilization is not recommended for use in salons. Most people without medical training do not understand how to use an autoclave. For example, dirty implements cannot be properly sterilized without first being properly 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Term

293) Pathogenic bacteria are known as:

A) Parasites / pathogens

B) Microbes

C) Germs

D) A, B and C

Definition

PARASITES / PATHOGENS  

MICROBES

GERMS

Pathogenic (path-uh-JEN-ik) bacteria are harmful microorganisms that can cause disease or infection in humans when they invade the body.

Bacteria (bak-TEER-ee-ah) (singular: bacterium, back-TEER-ee-um) are one-celled microorganisms that have both plant and animal characteristics.

A microorganism (my-kroh-OR-gah-niz-um) is any organism of microscopic or submicroscopic size. Some bacteria are harmful and some are harmless. Bacteria can exist almost anywhere: on skin, in water, in the air, in decayed matter, on environmental surfaces, in body secretions, on clothing, or under the free edge of nails. Bacteria are so small they can only be seen with a microscope. 

 

 

Term

294) Which of the following is not one of the 3 types of Pathogenic bacteria:

A) Cocci

B) Spirilla

C) Saprophytes

D) Bacilli

Definition

SAPROPHYTES

sap·ro·phyte (spr-ft) n. An organism, especially a fungus or bacterium that grows on and derives its nourishment from dead or decaying organic matter. 

•  Cocci (KOK-sy) are round-shaped bacteria that appear singly (alone)or in groups 

•  Bacilli (bah-SIL-ee) are short rod-shaped bacteria. They are the most common bacteria and produce diseases such as tetanus (lockjaw), 

 SPIRILLA  (spy-RIL-ah) are spiral or corkscrew-shaped bacteria. They are subdivided into subgroups, such as treponema papillida, which causes syphilis, a sexually transmitted disease  (STD), and borrelia burgdorferi, which causes Lyme disease 

 

•  Diplococci (dip-lo-KOK-sy) are spherical bacteria that grow in pairs and cause diseases such as pneumonia.

 

Staphylococci (staf-uh-loh-KOK-sy) are pus-forming bacteria that grow in clusters like bunches of grapes. They cause abscesses, pustules, and boils. Some types of staphylococci (or staph as many call it) may not cause infections in healthy humans.

•  Streptococci (strep-toh-KOK-sy) are pus-forming bacteria arranged in curved lines resembling a string of beads. They cause infections such as strep throat and blood poisoning .

 

 

Term

295) Bacteria that appears in bunches or grape like clusters:

A) Cocci

B) Streptococci

C) Staphlococci

D) Spirilla

Definition

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STAPHYLOCOCCI

 Staphylococci (staf-uh-loh-KOK-sy) are pus-forming bacteria that grow in clusters like bunches of grapes. They cause abscesses, pustules, and boils . Some types of staphylococci (or staph as many call it) may not cause infections in healthy humans

Term

296) Which of the following is a vegetable parasite:

A) Scabies

B) Pediculosis

C) Tinea / Ringworm

D) A & C

Definition

TINEA / RINGWORM

Tinea (TIN-ee-uh) is the technical term for ringworm. It is characterized by itching, scales, and, sometimes, painful circular lesions. Several patches may be present at one time. Tinea is caused by a fungal organism and not a parasite, as the old-fashioned term ringworm seems to suggest. All forms of tinea are contagious and can be easily transmitted from one person to another. Infected skin scales or hairs that contain the fungi are known to spread the disease. Bathtubs, swimming pools, and uncleaned personal articles are also sources of transmission. Practicing approved cleaning and disinfection procedures will help prevent the spread of this disease in the salon.