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HAIR COLOR
Hair Color
30
Cosmetology
08/15/2013

Additional Cosmetology Flashcards

 


 

Cards

Term

049) Used after the decolorizing process to achieve pale/delicate colors:

 A) Semi-permanent hair-

B) Demi-permanent hair-colors

C) Toners

D) Monochromaric hair-colors

Definition

TONERS

Toners are used primarily on prelightened hair to achieve pale, delicate colors. They require a double-process application. The first process is the application of the lightener; the second process is the application of the toner. No-lift demipermanent haircolors are often used as toners.

 

 

Term

050) Used on pre-lightened hair to achieve pale/delicate colors:

A) Semi-permanent hair-

B) Demi-permanent hair-colors

C) Toners

D) Monochromaric hair-colors

Definition

TONERS

Toners are used primarily on prelightened hair to achieve pale, delicate colors. They require a double-process application. The first process is the application of the lightener; the second process is the application of the toner. No-lift demipermanent haircolors are often used as toners.

Term

051) Light / pastel colors applied to pre-lightened hair to deposit color and neutralize unwanted pigment remaining in the hair after pre-lightening:

A) Semi-permanent hair-

B) Demi-permanent hair-colors

C) Toners

D) Monochromaric hair-colors

Definition

TONERS

Toners are used primarily on prelightened hair to achieve pale, delicate colors. They require a double-process application. The first process is the application of the lightener; the second process is the application of the toner. No-lift demipermanent haircolors are often used as toners.

Term

052) Which of the following does not require a P.D. (PREDISPOSITION TEST) Test: 

A) Analine Derivative

B) Toners

C) Temporary Colors / Certified colors

D) Demi-permanent Colors

Definition

Temporary Colors/Certified Colors



P.D. TEST PREDISPOSITION TEST also known as a patch test is given to a client 24 to 48 hours prior to any aniline derivative haircolor service. The patch test is given to determine whether or not your client has any allergies or sensitivity's to the color mixture that you will be using for the same hair-coloring service. It is recommended that the test be given either behind the ear or on the inside of your client's elbow. A negative skin test will show no sign's of inflammation and will indicate that the color may be safely applied to the client's hair. A positive result will show redness with a slight rash and itchiness. A client with these symptoms is allergic and should not receive the haircolor service that has been tested. Never use anilinederivative haircolor on your client's eyelashes or eyebrows, for this could cause serious problems or even blindness.

 

 

Term

053) To remove a yellow shade from the hair, use a/an _____________Toner:

A) Blue

B) Violet

C) Green

D) Orange

Definition

[image]

VIOLET

Complementary colors are Primary and secondary colors positioned directly opposite each other on the color wheel. Complementary colors include blue and orange, red and green, and yellow and violet. Complementary colors neutralize each other. When formulating haircolor, you will find that it is often your goal to emphasize or distract from skin tones or eye color. You may also want to neutralize or refine unwanted tones in the hair. Understanding complementary colors will help choose the correct tone to accomplish these goals. Here is an easy reference guide for color correction:

• When hair is green…use red to balance.

• When hair is red…use green to balance.

• When hair is blue…use orange to balance.

• When hair is orange…use blue to balance.

• When hair is yellow…use violet to balance.

• When hair is violet…use yellow to balance.

 

 

Term

054) To remove an orange shade from the hair, use a/an _________Toner:

A) Blue

B) Violet

C) Green

D) Lavender

Definition

[image]

BLUE

Complementary colors are Primary and secondary colors positioned directly opposite each other on the color wheel. Complementary colors include blue and orange, red and green, and yellow and violet. Complementary colors neutralize each other. When formulating haircolor, you will find that it is often your goal to emphasize or distract from skin tones or eye color. You may also want to neutralize or refine unwanted tones in the hair. Understanding complementary colors will help choose the correct tone to accomplish these goals. Here is an easy reference guide for color correction:

• When hair is green…use red to balance.

• When hair is red…use green to balance.

• When hair is blue…use orange to balance.

• When hair is orange…use blue to balance.

• When hair is yellow…use violet to balance.

• When hair is violet…use yellow to balance.

 

 

Term

055) If a client comes to a stylist with two inches of Canities regrowth, approximately how long has it been since her last hair-color service:

A) 1 month

B) 2 month

C) 3 month

D) 4 month

 

Definition

4 Months

CANTITIES: The technical term for gray hair

 

 

Term

056) To accurately predict hair-color results, preform a/an ____________test:

A) Elasticity test

B) Strand test

C) Match test

D) Porosity test

Definition

STRAND TEST

Preliminary Strand Test …...Once you have created a color formula for your client, try it out first on a small strand of hair. This preliminary strand test determines how the hair will react to the color formula and how long the formula should be left on the hair. The strand test is performed after the client is prepared for the coloring service

 

 

Term

057) Used to equalize the porosity of hair & deposits a base color in 1 application:

A) Toners

B) Drabbers

C) Intensifiers

D) Fillers

Definition

      FILLERS

Fillers are used to equalize porosity. Some fillers are ready to use as thee come from the manufacturer. Others are a mixture of haircolor  and conditioner that your instructor can help you prepare. There are two types of fillers: conditioner fillers and color fillers.

Conditioner fillers are used to recondition damaged, overly porous hair and equalize porosity so that the hair accepts the color evenly from strand to strand and from scalp to ends. They can be applied in a separate procedure or immediately prior to the color application.

Color fillers equalize porosity and deposit color in one application to provide a uniform contributing pigment on prelightened hair. Color fillers are used on over porous, prelightened hair to equalize porosity and provide a uniform contributing pigment that complements the desired finished color. Demipermanent haircolor products are commonly used as color fillers. Color fillers accomplish the following goals:

• Deposit color to faded ends and hair shaft.

• Help repair hair to hold a final color by replacing missing building blocks.

• prevent streaking and dull appearance.

• prevent off-color results.

• produce more uniform, natural-looking color. 

• Produce uniform color when coloring prelightened hair back to its natural color.

 

 

Term

058) Used to fill in porous ends, avoids streaking and uneven color deposit:

A) Fillers

B) Toners

C) Intensifiers

D) Drabbers

Definition

      FILLERS

Fillers are used to equalize porosity. Some fillers are ready to use as thee come from the manufacturer. Others are a mixture of haircolor  and conditioner that your instructor can help you prepare. There are two types of fillers: conditioner fillers and color fillers.

Conditioner fillers are used to recondition damaged, overly porous hair and equalize porosity so that the hair accepts the color evenly from strand to strand and from scalp to ends. They can be applied in a separate procedure or immediately prior to the color application.

Color fillers equalize porosity and deposit color in one application to provide a uniform contributing pigment on prelightened hair. Color fillers are used on over porous, prelightened hair to equalize porosity and provide a uniform contributing pigment that complements the desired finished color. Demipermanent haircolor products are commonly used as color fillers. Color fillers accomplish the following goals:

• Deposit color to faded ends and hair shaft.

• Help repair hair to hold a final color by replacing missing building blocks.

• prevent streaking and dull appearance.

• prevent off-color results.

• produce more uniform, natural-looking color. 

• Produce uniform color when coloring prelightened hair back to its natural color.

 

 

Term

059) Used in "tint-back" to prevent off color results and a dull appearance: 

A) Fillers

B) Toners

C) Intensifiers

D) Drabbers

Definition

      FILLERS

Fillers are used to equalize porosity. Some fillers are ready to use as thee come from the manufacturer. Others are a mixture of haircolor  and conditioner that your instructor can help you prepare. There are two types of fillers: conditioner fillers and color fillers.

Conditioner fillers are used to recondition damaged, overly porous hair and equalize porosity so that the hair accepts the color evenly from strand to strand and from scalp to ends. They can be applied in a separate procedure or immediately prior to the color application.

Color fillers equalize porosity and deposit color in one application to provide a uniform contributing pigment on prelightened hair. Color fillers are used on over porous, prelightened hair to equalize porosity and provide a uniform contributing pigment that complements the desired finished color. Demipermanent haircolor products are commonly used as color fillers. Color fillers accomplish the following goals:

• Deposit color to faded ends and hair shaft.

• Help repair hair to hold a final color by replacing missing building blocks.

• prevent streaking and dull appearance.

• prevent off-color results.

• produce more uniform, natural-looking color. 

• Produce uniform color when coloring prelightened hair back to its natural color.

 

 

Term

060) When coloring predominantly gray hair, the resultant color will be:

A) The same shade as the shade applied

B) One shade lighter than shade applied

C) One shade darker than the shade applied

D) Usually slightly warmer than expected

Definition

[image]

ONE SHADE LIGHTER THAN THE SHADE APPLIED

Gray hair accepts the level of the color applied. However, level 8 or lighter colors may not give complete coverage because of the low concentration of dye found in these lighter colors. Formulations from level 7 and darker will provide better coverage, and can be used to create pastel and blond tones if desired. For those clients who are 80 to 100 percent gray, a haircolor within the blond range is generally more flattering than a darker shade. This lighter level of artificial color may be selected to give a warm or cool finished color, depending on the client’s skin tone, eye color, and personal preference. One factor to consider when coloring low percentages of gray or salt-and-pepper hair to a darker level is that color on color will always make a darker color. The addition of dark artificial pigment to the natural pigment percentage assumes that the gray hair is equally distributed throughout the entire head. If, for instance, the majority of gray hair is located in the front section of the head, that section would be considered to have more gray hair, with the back portion containing less gray hair. In that instance, you would have to determine what formulation would best suit the client. The gray hair around the face is what the client sees, so it may be wise to formulate based on the percentage of gray hair the client actually sees. The section of hair that surrounds the face is what influences the client’s self-image.

Milady 2012 pg 656-7 and table 21-5

 

 

Term

061) A clients hair is 80% gray and wants it returned to it's original medium brown color; the stylist should choose a color shade: 

A) One shade lighter than original color

B) The same shade as original color

C) Two shades darker than original color

D) One shade darker than the shade applied

 

 

Definition

[image]

ONE SHADE DARKER THAN ORIGIONAL COLOR

   Gray hair accepts the level of the color applied. However, level 8 or lighter colors may not give complete coverage because of the low concentration of dye found in these lighter colors. Formulations from level 7 and darker will provide better coverage, and can be used to create pastel and blond tones if desired. For those clients who are 80 to 100 percent gray, a haircolor within the blond range is generally more flattering than a darker shade. This lighter level of artificial color may be selected to give a warm or cool finished color, depending on the client’s skin tone, eye color, and personal preference. One factor to consider when coloring low percentages of gray or salt-and-pepper hair to a darker level is that color on color will always make a darker color. The addition of dark artificial pigment to the natural pigment percentage assumes that the gray hair is equally distributed throughout the entire head. If, for instance, the majority of gray hair is located in the front section of the head, that section would be considered to have more gray hair, with the back portion containing less gray hair. In that instance, you would have to determine what formulation would best suit the client. The gray hair around the face is what the client sees, so it may be wise to formulate based on the percentage of gray hair the client actually sees. The section of hair that surrounds the face is what influences the client’s self-image.

 

 

Milady 2012 pg 656-7 and table 21-5

Term

147) Colors comprised of primarily red are considered: 

A) Pure

B) Primary

C) Warm

D) Cool

Definition

[image]

 

WARM

Warm tones can look lighter than their actual level. These tones are golden, orange, red, and yellow. Some haircolors use words such as auburn, amber, copper, strawberry, and bronze, which may be a better way to discuss and describe haircolor with the client. Cool tones can look deeper than their actual level. These tones are blue, green, and violet. Some describe cool tones as smoke or ash to the client. Natural tones are warm tones and are described as sandy or tan. 

RED, BLUE, AND YELLOW

Primary colors are Pure or fundamental colors (red, yellow, and blue) that cannot be created by combining other colors. All colors are created from these three primaries. Colors with a predominance of blue are cool colors, where as colors with a predominance of red and/or yellow are warm colors Blue is the strongest of the primary colors and is the only cool primary color. In addition to coolness, blue can also bring depth or darkness to and color. Red is the medium primary color. Adding red to blue-based colors will make them appear lighter; adding red to yellow colors will cause them to appear darker. Yellow is the weakest of the primary colors. When you add yellow to other colors, the resulting color will look lighter and brighter. When all three primary colors are present in equal proportions, the resulting color is brown. It is helpful to think of hair color in terms of different combinations of primary colors. Natural brown, for example, has the primary colors in the following proportions: blue-B, red-RR, and yellow-yyy. Black and white can’t be made by mixing colors together. They get excluded from basic color theory. White can be used to lighten a color. Black can be used to deepen a color. 

 

 

Term

184) To help predict the outcome of a hair-color, prior to coloring a client's hair, the stylist should perform this test:

A) P.D. Test

B) Match Test

C) Strand Test

D) Porosity Test

Definition
STRAND TEST
Term

211) The potential oxidation of varying H2O2 strengths is measured in:

A) Volume

B) Percentage

C) A and B 

C) Value

Definition

VOLUME (AND PERCENTAGE ? )

Volume measures the concentration and strength of hydrogen peroxide. The lower the volume, the less lift achieved; the higher the volume, the greater the lifting action. The majority of permanent haircolor products use 10-, 20-, 30-, or 40-volume hydrogen peroxide for proper lift and color development.

Term

256) According to the Law of color, this is the darkest color pigment and may be used to darken any color or pigment:

A) Blue

B) Red

C) Brown

D) Black

Definition

BLUE

Blue is the strongest of the primary colors and is the only cool primary color. in addition to coolness, blue can also bring depth or darkness to any color.

 

Term

257) The 3 Primary or Pure colors are: 

A) Red, White and Blue

B) Orange, Green, and Violet /  purple

C) Red, Yellow, and Green

D) Red, Blue, Yellow

Definition

[image]

RED, BLUE, AND YELLOW

Primary colors are Pure or fundamental colors (red, Yellow, and blue) that cannot be created by combining other colors. All colors are created from these three primaries. Colors with a predominance of blue are cool colors, where as colors with a predominance of red and/or yellow are warm colors Blue is the strongest of the primary colors and is the only cool primary color. In addition to coolness, blue can also bring depth or darkness to and color. Red is the medium primary color. Adding red to blue-based colors will make them appear lighter; adding red to yellow colors will cause them to appear darker. Yellow is the weakest of the primary colors. When you add yellow to other colors, the resulting color will look lighter and brighter. When all three primary colors are present in equal proportions, the resulting color is brown. it is helpful to think of hair color in terms of different combinations of primary colors. Natural brown, for example, has the primary colors in the following proportions: blue-B, red-RR, and yellow-yyy. Black and white can’t be made by mixing colors together. They get excluded from basic color theory. White  can be used to lighten a color. Black can be used to deepen a color. 

 

 

Term

258) The 3 secondary colors are: 

A) Red, White and Blue

B) Orange, Green, and Violet /  purple

C) Red, Yellow, and Green

D) Red, Blue, Yellow

Definition

[image]

ORANGE, GREEN, VIOLET / PURPLE

A secondary color is a color obtained be mixing equal parts of two primary colors. The secondary colors are green, orange, and violet. Green is an equal combination of blue and yellow. Orange is an equal combination of red and yellow. Violet is an equal combination of blue and red

Term

259) Term used to mean the color pigment of the skin, eyes, and hair: 

A) Melanocytes

B) Eumelanin

C) Pheomelanin

D) Melanin

Definition

[image]

                          MELANIN

The color of the skin—whether fair, medium, or dark—depends primarily on melanin (MEL-ah-nin), the tiny grains of pigment (coloring matter) that are produced by melanocytes and then deposited into cells in the stratum germinativum layer of the epidermis and the papillary layers of the dermis. The color of the skin is a hereditary trait and varies among races and Nationalities. Genes determine the amount and type of pigment produced in an individual. The body produces two types of melanin: 

pheomelanin (fee-oh-MEL-uh-nin), which is red to yellow in color, and eumelanin (yoo-MEL-uh-nin), which is dark brown to black. People with light-colored skin mostly produce pheomelanin, while those with dark-colored skin mostly produce eumelanin. The size of melanin granules varies from one individual to another. Melanin helps protect sensitive cells from the sun’s UV light, but it does not provide enough protection to prevent skin damage. Daily use of a sunscreen with a sun protection factor (SPF) of 15 or higher can help the melanin protect the skin from burning, skin cancer, and premature aging 

 

 

Term

260) Dark hair, dark eyes, and dark skin would indicate the presence of: 

A) Melanocytes

B) Eumelanin

C) Pheomelanin

D) Melanin

Definition

[image]

EUMELANIN

pheomelanin (fee-oh-MEL-uh-nin), which is red to yellow in color, and eumelanin (yoo-MEL-uh-nin), which is dark brown to black. People with light-colored skin mostly produce pheomelanin, while those with dark-colored skin mostly produce eumelanin. The size of melanin granules varies from one individual to another. 

Term

268) The opposite of yellow, used to neutralize or cancel yellow: 

A) Violet

B) Blue

C) Green

D) Orange

Definition

[image]

VIOLET

Complementary colors are Primary and secondary colors positioned directly opposite each other on the color wheel. Complementary colors include blue and orange, red and green, and yellow and violet. Complementary colors neutralize each other. When formulating haircolor, you will find that it is often your goal to emphasize or distract from skin tones or eye color. You may also want to neutralize or refine unwanted tones in the hair. Understanding complementary colors will help you choose the correct tone to accomplish these goals. Here is an easy reference guide for color correction:

• When hair is green…use red to balance.

• When hair is red…use green to balance.

• When hair is blue…use orange to balance.

• When hair is orange…use blue to balance.

• When hair is yellow…use violet to balance.

• When hair is violet…use yellow to balance.

 

 

Term

368) After removing the lightener you observe dark spots on the hair shaft, what should you do:

A) Apply an ash toner

B) Apply more lightener

C) Apply a lighter toner

D) Both A and C 

Definition

APPLY MORE LIGHTENER

Check for lightening action about fifteen minutes before the time indicated by the preliminary strand test. Spray a hair strand with a water bottle and remove the lightener with a damp towel. Examine the strand. If the strand is not light enough, reapply the mixture and continue testing frequently until the desired level is reached.

 

 

Term

387) A system for understanding the relationships of color is called:

A) The level System

B) The Law of Complimentary Color

C) The Color Wheel

D) The law of Color

Definition

[image]

THE LAW OF COLOR

The law of color is a system for understanding color relationships. When combining colors, you will always get the same result from the same combination. Equal parts of red and blue mixed together always make violet. Equal parts of blue and yellow always make green. Equal parts of red and yellow always make orange. The color wheels   will help you understand colors.

 

 

Term

388) A system for determining the lightness or darkness of color is called:

A) The level System

B) The Law of Complimentary Color

C) The Color Wheel

D) The law of Color

Definition

[image]

THE LEVEL SYSTEM

Level is the unit of measurement used to identify the lightness or darkness of a color. level is the saturation, density, or concentration of color. The level of color answers the following question:

How much color? 

The level system is a system that colorists use to determine the lightness or darkness of a hair color. Haircolor levels are arranged on a scale of 1 to 10, with 1 being the darkest and 10 the lightest. Although the names for the color levels may vary among manufacturers, the important thing is being able to identify the degrees of lightness to darkness (depth) in each level.

.

 

 

 

 

Term

392) Metallic Salts are products often found in at-home hair coloring products, especially men's products. They will tend to darken the hair gradually, over repeated usage. They are incompatible with permanent waves preparations as well as any other chemical service, and may result in all the following except:

A) Hair breakage

B) Hair discoloration

C) Overly tight curl formation

D) Uneven curl fromation

Definition

   

OVERLY TIGHT CURL

Metallic Salts

Some home haircoloring products contain metallic salts that are not compatible with permanent waving. Metallic salts leave a coating on the hair that may cause uneven curls, severe discoloration, or hair breakage. Metallic salts leave a coating on the hair that may cause uneven curls, severe discoloration, or hair breakage. Metallic salts are more commonly found in men’s haircolors that are sold for home use. Haircolor restorers and progressive haircolors that darken the hair gradually with repeated applications are the most likely to contain metallic salts. If you suspect that metallic salts may be present on the hair, perform the following test. In a glass or plastic bowl, mix 1 ounce of 20-volume peroxide with 20 drops of 28-percent ammonia. Immerse at least 20 strands of hair in the solution for thirty minutes. If metallic salts are not present, the hair will lighten slightly and you may proceed with the service. If metallic salts are present, the hair will lighten rapidly. The solution may get hot and give off an unpleasant odor, indicating that you should not proceed with the service.

 

 

Term

396) The Complimentary Color of violet is:

A) Yellow

B) Orange

C) Blue

D) Red

Definition

[image]

YELLOW

Complementary colors are Primary and secondary colors positioned directly opposite each other on the color wheel. Complementary colors include blue and orange, red and green, and yellow and violet.

Complementary colors neutralize each other when formulating haircolor, you will find that it is often your goal to emphasize or distract from skin tones or eye color. You may also want to neutralize or refine unwanted tones in the hair. Understanding complementary colors will help you choose the correct tone to accomplish these goals. Here is an easy reference guide for color correction:

• When hair is green…use red to balance.

• When hair is red…use green to balance.

• When hair is blue…use orange to balance.

• When hair is orange…use blue to balance.

• When hair is yellow…use violet to balance.

• When hair is violet…use yellow to balance.

 

 

Term

402) An other term for color is:

A) Tone

B) Hue

C) Shade

D) Tint

Definition

HUE

The tone, also known as hue, is the balance of color. The tone or hue answers the question of which color to use based on the client’s desired results. These tones can be described as warm, cool, or neutral. Warm tones can look lighter than their actual level. These tones are golden, orange, red, and yellow. Some haircolors use words such as auburn, amber, copper, strawberry, and bronze, which may be a better way to discuss and describe haircoior with the client. Cool tones can look deeper than their actual level. These tones are blue, green, and violet. Some describe cool tones as smoke or ash to the client. Natural tones are warm tones and are described as sandy or tan. 

Term

403) The lightness or darkness of color is referred to as its:

A) Intensity

B) Value

C) Tone

D) Hue

Definition
VALUE
Term

404) ________ refers to the warmth or coolness of a color:

A) Tone

B) Hue

C) Shade

D) Tint

Definition
TONE