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Adrenergic Structures
Some structures of common adrenergic drugs
10
Pharmacology
02/07/2011

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Term
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Definition
Selective Beta 1 Antagonists.

Things to look for:

Most important is para substitution on the benzene ring, but you also amine on the other end

Drugs in this class:
Acebutolol
Bisoprolol
Metoprolol
Atenolol
Esmolol
Term
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Definition
Selective alpha 2 antagonist
How to recognize it:
Look for FIVE fused rings. Only drug we know that has this structure. I'm gonna remember five golden rings, because when I think of giving someone a gold ring, I think of marriage and weddings. What do you do do if you can't keep it up afterwards? Take Yohimbine.
Term
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Definition
Selective alpha 1 antagonists
What to look for:
SAR includes the imadzole fused rings. For those of us that have no idea what an imadazole means, look for the five nitrogens, three of which are in two fused benzene rings. Also, look for the little oxygens on the end that look like antennas. It's a common structural feature, but these are the only adrenagenic drugs that have that.

What do they do? They treat BPH.
Drugs in this class: Terazosin, Tamsulosin, Doxazosin, Prazosin
Term
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Definition
nonselective beta antagonists.
What to look for:
Nitrogen with a relatively bulky group on the right
The existence of a hydroxl next to that.
Usually two fused rings, one benzene, one heptane
NOT para substituted
And the ether bridge, which is actually really important
Drugs in this class:
Propranolol
Pindolol
Cartelol
Nadolol
Sotalol
Timolol

Another thing to remember. Does it start with a vowel? If so, it's selective. There are only two selective ones that start with consonants: metoprolol and bisoprolol.
Term
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Definition
Mixed alpha 1/beta 1 antagonists
What to look for: BIG bulky group off of that nitrogen on the right. Also got a lot of stuff going on the left on a benzene ring, fused or not.
S,R isomer = alpha 1
R,R = beta 1 and 2

How do I remember that? well. RR = railroad. BB is another pair of things that repeat. the SR one, well, it only does one thing. It's not much to go on, but it works for me.

Drugs in this class: Labetolol and Carvedilol
Term
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Definition
Indirect or mixed agonists

Things to look for:
NO hydroxyls on the benzene. Also, they're pretty bare all over. They all also have a methyl group next to the nitrogen. There MIGHT be something next to that, but it's not required.

Drugs in this class:
Amphetamine, methamphetamine, phenylpropanolamine, methylphenidate, epederine, pseudoephederine, and dexmethylphenidate.
Term
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Definition
Selective Beta 2 agonists
Things to look for: Two hydroxyls like bull horns or two hydroxyls side by side with a methyl blocking one of them so COMT can't chew it up. Also, you've got a nitrogen with a relatively bulky group on the end.
Remember: One heart, two lungs. These all keep asthmatics breathing.
Drugs in this class:
Terbutaline, Albuterol, Pirbuterol, Metaproterenol, and salmeterol.
Term
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Definition
Selective alpha 2 agonists

Things to look for: Two chlorines. That's about it. Few nitrogens here and there, but chlorines are the key.

Drugs in this class: Clonidine, Guanabenz, Guanfacine

How to remember it? Well. Here's my mnemonic. Two out of three have Guan in the name. That reminds me of guano, which is the technical term for bat poop. Alpha 2, number 2... you see where this goes.
Term
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Definition
Alpha 1 selective agonists

What to look for:
These things look like epinephrine minus one OH on the benzene ring. There's not a lot to go on here.

Drugs in this class:

Phenylephrine and Metaraminol
Term
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Definition
Alpha 1 agonists

What to look for: Honestly, I got no idea. Nothing stands out except the two nitrogens in the five membered ring on the right. These things suck.

Drugs in this class:
Tetrahydrozoline
Oxymetazoline