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HAIR & SCALP
hair & scalp
40
Cosmetology
Professional
08/14/2013

Additional Cosmetology Flashcards

 


 

Cards

Term

016) The study of hair is known as:

A) Myology

B) Histology

C) Osteology

D) Trichology

Definition

Trichology

The scientific study of hair and scalp its diseases and care is called trichology (trih-KAHL-uh-jee), which comes from the Greek words trichos (hair) and ology (the study of)

 

 

Term

018) Soft fine, downy un-pigmented hair; often referred to as "peach fuzz": 

A) Terminal

B) Barba

C) Lanugo

D) Vellus

Definition


VELLUS

Vellus hair (VEL-us HAYR), also known as lanugo hair (luh-NOO-goh _ HAYR), is short, fine, unpigmented, and downy hair that appears on the body. Vellus hair almost never has a medulla. It is commonly found on infants and can be present on children until puberty. On adults, vellus hair is usually found in places that are normally considered hairless (forehead, eyelids, and bald scalp), as well as nearly all other areas of the body, except the palms of the hands and the soles of the feet. Women normally retain 55 percent more vellus hair than men. Vellus hair helps with the evaporation of perspiration.

 

 

Term

019) Soft, Downy, pigmented hair is referred to as:

A) Terminal

B) Barba

C) Lanugo

D) Vellus

Definition

LANUGO

Lanugo (/la·nu·go/, from Latin lana “wool”) is very fine, soft, and usually unpigmented, downy hair on the body of a fetus or newborn baby. It is the first hair to be produced by the fetal hair follicles, and it usually appears on the fetus at about 5 months of gestation. It is normally shed before birth, around 7 or 8 months of gestation but is often present at birth and disappears on its own within a few days or weeks. Lanugo hair will invariably be shed by three to four months after birth. It is replaced by hair covering the same surfaces called vellus hair, but this hair is finer and more difficult to see. The more visible hair that continues into adulthood is called terminal hair. This forms in specific areas and is hormone dependant

 

 

Term

022) Refers to the growth of an unusual amount of hair on parts of the body normally bearing only downy hair, such as the faces of women and backs of men: 

A) Hirsuties

B) Hypertrichosis

C) Hirutism

D) All of the above

Definition

HIRSUTIES-HIRSUTISM-HYPERTRICHOSIS

 

Hirsuties is the growth in a woman of coarse terminal hair in a male distribution

 

Hirsutism is the excessive hairiness on women in those parts of the body where terminal hair does not normally occur or is minimal - for example, a beard or chest hair. It refers to a male pattern of body hair (androgenic hair) and it is therefore primarily of cosmetic and psychological concern. Hirsutism is a medical sign rather than a disease and may be a sign of a more serious medical condition, especially if it develops well after puberty. The amount and location of the hair is measured by a Ferriman-Gallwey score. 

 

Hypertrichosis (hi-pur-trih-KOH-sis), also known as hirsuties (hur-SOO-shee-eez), is a condition of abnormal  growth of hair. It is characterized by the growth of terminal hair in areas of the body that normally grow only vellus hair. Mustaches or light beards on women are examples of hypertrichosis.  Treatments for hypertrichosis include electrolysis, photoepilation, laser hair removal, shaving, tweezing, electronic tweezers, depilatories, epilators, threading, and sugaring

 

 

 

 

Term

086) What are the stages of hair growth from beginning to end?

A) Anagen, Catagen, Halogen

B) telagen, Catagen, Anagen

C) Catagen, Anagen, Telegen

D) Anagen, Catagen, Telagen

 

Definition

[image]

 

Anagen,Catagen, Telagen

Hair growth occurs in cycles. Each complete cycle has three phases that are repeated over and over again throughout life. The three phases are anagen, catagen, and telogen

 During the anagen phase (AN-uh-jen _ FAYZ), also known as growth phase, new hair is produced. New cells are actively manufactured in the hair follicle. During this phase, hair cells are produced faster than any other normal cell in the human body. The average growth of healthy scalp hair is about ½ (0.5) inch (1.25 centimeters) per month. The rate of growth varies on different parts of the body, between sexes, and with age. Scalp hair grows faster on women than on men. Scalp hair grows rapidly between the ages of 15 and 30, but slows down sharply after the age of 50. About 90 percent of scalp hair is growing in the Anagen phase at any time. The anagen phase generally lasts from three to five years, but in some cases, it can last as long as 10 years. The longer the anagen cycle is, the longer the hair is able to grow. This is why some people can only grow their hair down to their shoulders, while others can grow it down to the floor!

The catagen phase (KAT-uh-jen _ FAYZ) is the brief transition period between the growth and resting phases of a hair follicle. It signals the end of the anagen phase. During the catagen phase, the follicle canal shrinks and detaches from the dermal papilla. The hair bulb disappears and the shrunken root end forms a rounded club. Less than one percent of scalp hair is in the catagen phase at any time. The catagen phase is very short, lasting from one to two weeks.

  The telogen phase (TEL-uh-jen _ FAYZ), also known as resting phase, is the final phase in the hair cycle and lasts until the fully grown hair is shed. The hair is either shed during the telogen phase or remains in place until the next anagen phase, when the new hair growing in pushes it out. About 10 percent of scalp hair is in the telogen phase at any one time. The telogen phase lasts for approximately three to six months. As soon as the telogen phase ends, the hair returns to the anagen phase and begins the entire cycle again. On average, the entire growth cycle repeats itself once every four to five years

 

 

Term

102) What stage of hair growth is know as the "Growth Active Stage" 

A) Anagen

B) Halogen

C) Catagen

D)Telagen

Definition

Anagen

Anagen,Catagen, Telagen

Hair growth occurs in cycles. Each complete cycle has three phases that are repeated over and over again throughout life. The three phases are anagen, catagen, and telogen

 During the anagen phase (AN-uh-jen _ FAYZ), also known as growth phase, new hair is produced. New cells are actively manufactured in the hair follicle. During this phase, hair cells are produced faster than any other normal cell in the human body. The average growth of healthy scalp hair is about ½ (0.5) inch (1.25 centimeters) per month. The rate of growth varies on different parts of the body, between sexes, and with age. Scalp hair grows faster on women than on men. Scalp hair grows rapidly between the ages of 15 and 30, but slows down sharply after the age of 50. About 90 percent of scalp hair is growing in the Anagen phase at any time. The anagen phase generally lasts from three to five years, but in some cases, it can last as long as 10 years. The longer the anagen cycle is, the longer the hair is able to grow. This is why some people can only grow their hair down to their shoulders, while others can grow it down to the floor!

The catagen phase (KAT-uh-jen _ FAYZ) is the brief transition period between the growth and resting phases of a hair follicle. It signals the end of the anagen phase. During the catagen phase, the follicle canal shrinks and detaches from the dermal papilla. The hair bulb disappears and the shrunken root end forms a rounded club. Less than one percent of scalp hair is in the catagen phase at any time. The catagen phase is very short, lasting from one to two weeks.

  The telogen phase (TEL-uh-jen _ FAYZ), also known as resting phase, is the final phase in the hair cycle and lasts until the fully grown hair is shed. The hair is either shed during the telogen phase or remains in place until the next anagen phase, when the new hair growing in pushes it out. About 10 percent of scalp hair is in the telogen phase at any one time. The telogen phase lasts for approximately three to six months. As soon as the telogen phase ends, the hair returns to the anagen phase and begins the entire cycle again. On average, the entire growth cycle repeats itself once every four to five years

 

Term

104) The stage of growth in which hair if falling out referred to as: 

A) Anagen/Growth

B) Catagen/Transitional

C) Telagen/Resting

D) All of the above

Definition

                                             ???

The hair is either shed during the telogen phase or remains in place until the next anagen phase, when the new hair 

The telogen phase (TEL-uh-jen FAYZ), also known as resting phase, is the final phase in the hair cycle and lasts until the fully grown hair is shed. The hair is either shed during the telogen phase or remains in place until the next anagen phase, when the new hair growing in pushes it out. About 10 percent of scalp hair is in the telogen phase at any one time. The telogen phase lasts for approximately three to six months. As soon as the telogen phase ends, the hair returns to the anagen phase and begins the entire cycle again. On average, the entire growth cycle repeats itself once every four to five years

 The catagen phase (KAT-uh-jen FAYZ) is the brief transition period between the growth and resting phases of a hair follicle. It signals the end of the anagen phase. During the catagen phase, the follicle canal shrinks and detaches from the dermal papilla. The hair bulb disappears and the shrunken root end forms a rounded club. Less than one percent of scalp hair is in the catagen phase at any time. The catagen phase is very short, lasting from one to two weeks.

During the anagen phase (AN-uh-jen FAYZ), also known as growth phase, new hair is produced. New cells are actively manufactured in the hair follicle. During this phase, hair cells are produced faster than any other normal cell in the human body. The average growth of healthy scalp hair is about ½ (0.5) inch (1.25 centimeters) per month. The rate of growth varies on different parts of the body, between sexes, and with age. Scalp hair grows faster on women than on men. Scalp hair grows rapidly between the ages of 15 and 30, but slows down sharply after the age of 50.

 About 90 percent of scalp hair is growing in the anagen phase at any time. The anagen phase generally lasts from three to five years, but in some cases, it can last as long as 10 years. The longer the anagen cycle is, the longer the hair is able to grow. This is why some people can only grow their hair down to their shoulders, while others can grow it down to the floor

 

Milady 2012 pg. 227-228

 

Term

180) The tecnical term for dandruff is:

A) Pityriasis

B) Pityriasis Capitis Simplex

C) Pityriasis Steatoids

D) Pityriasis versicolor

Definition

PITYRIASIS

Pityriasis (pit-ih-RY-uh-sus) is the technical term for dandruff, which is characterized by the excessive production and accumulation of skin cells. Instead of the normal, one-at-a-time shedding of tiny individual skin cells, dandruff is the shedding of an accumulation of large visible clumps of skin cells. Although the cause of dandruff has been debated for over 150 years, current research confirms that dandruff is the result of a fungus called malassezia (mal-uh-SEEZ-ee-uh). Malassezia is a naturally occurring fungus that is present on all human skin but causes the symptoms of dandruff when it grows out of control. Some individuals are also more susceptible to malassezia’s irritating effects. Factors such as stress, age, hormones, and poor hygiene can cause the fungus to multiply and dandruff symptoms to worsen.

 Pityriasis capitis simplex (pit-ih-RY-uh-sus _  KAP-ih-tis _  SIM-pleks) is the technical term for classic dandruff that is characterized by scalp irritation, large flakes, and an itchy scalp. The scales may attach to the scalp in masses, scatter loosely in the hair, or fall to the shoulders. Regular use of antidandruff shampoos, conditioners, and topical  lotions are the best treatment.

 Pityriasis steatoides (pit-ih-RY-uh-sus _ stee-uh-TOY-deez) is a more severe case of dandruff characterized by an accumulation of greasy or waxy scales, mixed with sebum, that stick to the scalp in crusts. 

 

 

Term

181) Greasy / Waxy dandruff is known as:

A) Pityriasis

B) Pityriasis Capitis Simplex

C) Pityriasis Steatoidsis

D) Pityriasis Versicolor

Definition

Pityriasis Steatoidsis

Pityriasis steatoides (pit-ih-RY-uh-sus _ stee-uh-TOY-deez) is a more severe case of dandruff characterized by an accumulation of greasy or waxy scales, mixed with sebum, that stick to the scalp in crusts. 

Pityriasis (pit-ih-RY-uh-sus) is the technical term for dandruff, which is characterized by the excessive production and accumulation of skin cells. Instead of the normal, one-at-a-time shedding of tiny individual skin cells, dandruff is the shedding of an accumulation of large visible clumps of skin cells. Although the cause of dandruff has been debated for over 150 years, current research confirms that dandruff is the result of a fungus called malassezia (mal-uh-SEEZ-ee-uh). Malassezia is a naturally occurring fungus that is present on all human skin but causes the symptoms of dandruff when it grows out of control. Some individuals are also more susceptible to malassezia’s irritating effects. Factors such as stress, age, hormones, and poor hygiene can cause the fungus to multiply and dandruff symptoms to worsen.

 Pityriasis capitis simplex                                                            (pit-ih-RY-uh-sus _  KAP-ih-tis _  SIM-pleks) is the technical term for classic dandruff that is characterized by scalp irritation, large flakes, and an itchy scalp. The scales may attach to the scalp in masses, scatter loosely in the hair, or fall to the shoulders. Regular use of antidandruff shampoos, conditioners, and topical  lotions are the best treatment.

 

Term

182) Dry / Flaky dandruff is known as:

A) Pityriasis

B) Pityriasis Capitis Simplex

C) Pityriasis Steatoidsis

D) Pityriasis Versicolor

Definition

Pityriasis capitis simplex 

 (pit-ih-RY-uh-sus _ KAP-ih-tis _  SIM-pleks) is the technical term for classic dandruff that is characterized by scalp irritation, large flakes, and an itchy scalp. The scales may attach to the scalp in masses, scatter loosely in the hair, or fall to the shoulders. Regular use of antidandruff shampoos, conditioners, and topical lotions are the best treatment. 

Pityriasis (pit-ih-RY-uh-sus) is the technical term for dandruff, which is characterized by the excessive production and accumulation of skin cells. Instead of the normal, one-at-a-time shedding of tiny individual skin cells, dandruff is the shedding of an accumulation of large visible clumps of skin cells. Although the cause of dandruff has been debated for over 150 years, current research confirms that dandruff is the result of a fungus called malassezia (mal-uh-SEEZ-ee-uh). Malassezia is a naturally occurring fungus that is present on all human skin but causes the symptoms of dandruff when it grows out of control. Some individuals are also more susceptible to malassezia’s irritating effects. Factors such as stress, age, hormones, and poor hygiene can cause the fungus to multiply and dandruff symptoms to worsen. 

  Pityriasis steatoides 

(pit-ih-RY-uh-sus stee-uh-TOY-deez) is a more severe case of dandruff characterized by an accumulation of greasy or waxy scales, mixed with sebum, that stick to the scalp in crusts. 

Term

183) Prior to perming / chemically relaxing the hair, perform a/an:

A) Elasticity Test

B) Match Test

C) Strand Test

D) Porosity test

Definition

Elasticity test and porosity test

Perform an analysis of the hair and scalp. Perform tests for  porosity and elasticity. Remember, this procedure requires that the hair and scalp be completely dry.

Term

184) To help predict the outcome of a hair-color, prior to coloring a client's hair, the stylist should perform this test:

A) P.D. Test

B) Match Test

C) Strand Test

D) Porosity Test

Definition
STRAND TEST
Term

185) To test the hair's ability to absorb moisture (including waving lotion, relaxer, hair color, and all other liquids), preform a /an _______________ Test: 

A) Elasticity Test

B) Match Test

C) Strand Test

D) Porosity Test

Definition

POROSITY TEST

Hair porosity is the ability of the hair to absorb moisture. The degree of porosity is directly related to the condition of the cuticle layer. Healthy hair with a compact cuticle layer is naturally resistant to being penetrated by moisture and is referred to as hydrophobic (hy-druh-FOHB-ik). Porous hair has a raised cuticle layer that easily absorbs moisture and is called hydrophilic (hy-druh-FIL-ik).Hair with low porosity is considered resistant. Chemical services performed on hair with low porosity require a more alkaline solution than those on hair with high porosity. Alkaline solutions raise the cuticle and permit uniform saturation and processing on resistant hair.

Hair with average porosity is considered to be normal hair. Chemical services performed on this type of hair will usually process as expected, according to the texture.

 

 

Term

217) Density refers to: 

A) The diameter of the hair strand

B) The number of hairs on the head

C) The number of hairs per square inch

D) The texture of the hair

Definition

The number of hairs per square

inch

Hair density measures the number of individual hair strands on 1 square inch (2.5 square centimeters) of scalp. It indicates how many hairs there are on a person’s head. Hair density can be classified as low, medium, or high (also known as thin, medium, or thick / dense). Hair density is different from hair texture—individuals with the same hair texture can have different densities.

Term

218) Hair texture refers to:

A) The diameter of the hair strand

B) The number of hairs on the head

C) The number of hairs per square inch 

D) The texture of the hair

 

Definition

[image]

The diameter of the hair strand

Hair texture is the thickness or diameter of the individual hair strand. Hair texture can be classified as coarse, medium, or fine and can vary from strand to strand on the same person’s head. It is not uncommon for hair from different areas of the head to have different textures. Hair on the nape (back of the neck), crown, temples, and front hairline of the same person may have different textures.

 

 

Term

219) Hair texture may be classified as all of the following except: 

A) Medium

B) Curly

C) Coarse

D) Fine

Definition

[image]

CURLY

Coarse hair texture has the largest diameter. It is stronger than fine hair, for the same reason that a thick rope is stronger than a thin rope. It is often more resistant to processing than medium or fine hair, so it usually requires more processing when you are applying products such as hair lighteners, haircolors, permanent waving solutions, and chemical hair relaxers. 

Medium hair texture is the most common texture and is the standard to which other hair is compared. Medium hair does not pose any special problems or concerns.

 Fine hair has the smallest diameter and is more fragile, easier to process, and more susceptible to damage from chemical services than coarse or medium hair. 

As with hair cuticle analysis, hair texture can be determined by feeling a single dry strand between the fingers. Take an individual strand from four different areas of the head—front hairline, temple, crown, and nape—and hold each strand securely with one hand while feeling it with the thumb and forefinger of the other hand. With a little practice, you will be able to feel the difference between coarse, medium, and fine hair diameters

 

 

Term

220) This is the most common angle used in hair cutting:

A: 0

B) 45

C) 90

D) 180

Definition

[image]

45

Term

221) The outer perometer of the haircut is known as the:

A) Design Line

B) Weight Line

C) Guide Line

D) All of the above

Definition

DESIGN LINE

Points on the head that mark where the surface of the head changes or the behavior of the hair changes, such as ears, jawline, occipital bone, apex, and so on; used to establish design lines that are proportionate.

 

Term

222) To achieve a "solid Form", or one lenth Haircut, use this elevation:

A: 0

B) 45

C) 90

D) 180

Definition
0
Term

223) To achieve a "solid Form", or one lenth Haircut, use a:

A: Traveling guide line

B) Vertical guide line

C) Stationary Guide Line

D) Combination of A and C

Definition

  STATIONARY GUIDE LINE

A guideline, also known as guide, as a sectton of hair that determines the length the hair will be cut. Guidelines are located either at the perimeter, the outer line, or the interior, inner or internal line, of the cut. The guideline is usually the first section cut when creating a shape. The two types of guidelines in haircuttung are stationary and traveling.

Term

224) To properly thin the hair, the thinning shears should be:

A) 1 inch from the ends

B) 1/2 inch from the scalp

C) 1/4 inch from the ends

D) 1 inch from the scalp

Definition

1 INCH FROM THE SCALP

Texturizing shears are mainly used to remove bulk from the hair. They are sometimes referred to as thinning shears, tapering shears, or notching shears. Many types of thinning shears are used today, with varying amounts of teeth in the blades. A general rule of thumb is that the more teeth in the shear, the less hair is removed per cut. Notching shears are usually designed to remove more hair, with larger teeth set farther apart. Removing bulk (thinning). Thinning shears were originally created for the purpose of thinning hair and blending. Many clients are afraid of the word thinning. A better choice of words would be removing bulk or removing weight. When using the thinning shears for this purpose, it is best to follow the same sectioning as used on the haircut. Comb the subsection out from the head and cut it with the thinning scissors, at least 4 to 5 inches (10 to 12.5 centimeters) from the scalp. On longer lengths, you may need to repeat the process again as you move out toward the ends. On coarse hair textures, stay farther away from the scalp, as sometimes the shorter hairs will poke through the haircut. On blunt haircuts, avoid thinning the top surfaces, because you may see lines where the hair is cut with the thinning shears. When working on curly hair, it is best to use the free-hand notching technique rather than thinning shears.

 Removing weight from the ends you can also use thinning shears to remove bulk from the ends. This process works well on many hair textures. It can be used on both thin and thick hair, and it helps taper the perimeter of both graduated and blunt haircuts. Elevating each subsection out from the head, place the thinning shears into the hair at an angle and close the shears a few times as you work out toward the ends

 

Term

229) The most common cutting position in a hair cut:

A) Palm up

B) Palm to Palm

C) Palm Down

C) A and C

Definition

[image]

 Cutting palm-to-palm. When cutting with a vertical or diagonal cutting line, cutting palm-to-palm is the best way to maintain control of the subsection, especially with regard to elevation and overdirection. Cutting palm-to-palm means that the palms of both hands are facing each other while cutting. This is different from cutting on the top of your fingers or knuckles. Cutting palm-to-palm also helps to prevent strain on your back as you work 

Term

237) The portion of the haircut above the parietal ridge is referred to as the:

A) Interior

B) Exterior

C) Fringe

D) Design Line

Definition

[image]

INTERIOR 

Parietal ridge. This is the widest area of the head, starting at the temples and ending at the bottom of the crown. This area is easily found by placing a comb flat on the side of the head: the parietal ridge is found where the head starts to curve away from the comb. The parietal ridge is also referred to as the crest area. A guideline, also known as guide, is a section of hair that determines the length the hair will be cut. Guidelines are located either at the perimeter, the outer line, or the interior, inner or internal line, of the cut. The guideline is usually the first section cut when creating a shape. The two types of guidelines in haircutting are stationary and traveling.

 

 

Term

238) The portion of the haircut below the parietal ridge is referred to as the:

A) Interior

B) Exterior

C) Fringe

D) Design Line

Definition

EXTERIOR

Parietal ridge. This is the widest area of the head, starting at the temples and ending at the bottom of the crown. This area is easily found by placing a comb flat on the side of the head: the parietal ridge is found where the head starts to curve away from the comb. The parietal ridge is also referred to as the crest area. A guideline, also known as guide, is a section of hair that determines the length the hair will be Cut. Guidelines are located either at the perimeter, the outer line, or the interior, inner or internal line, of the cut. The guideline is usually the first section cut when creating a shape. The two types of guidelines in haircutting are stationary and traveling

 

 

 

 

Term

327) Which is the longest stage of hair growth:

A) Halogen

B) Telagen

C) Catagan

D) Anagen

Definition

                        ANAGEN

 During the anagen phase (AN-uh-jen FAYZ), also known as growth phase, new hair is produced. New cells are actively manufactured in the hair follicle. During this phase, hair cells are produced faster than any other normal cell in the human body. The average growth of healthy scalp hair is about ½ (0.5) inch (1.25 centimeters) per month. The rate of growth varies  on different parts of the body, between sexes, and with age. Scalp hair grows faster on women than on men. Scalp hair grows rapidly between the ages of 15 and 30, but slows down sharply after the age of 50. About 90 percent of scalp hair is growing in the anagen phase at any time. The anagen phase generally lasts from three to five years, but in some cases, it can last as long as 10 years. The longer the anagen cycle is, the longer the hair is able to grow. This is why some people can only grow their hair down to their shoulders, while others can grow it down to the floor!

Term

328) Which is know as the "Resting Stage" of the hair:

A) Halogen

B) Telagen

C) Catagan

D) Anagen

 

Definition

TELAGEN

The telogen phase (TEL-uh-jen FAYZ), also known as resting phase, is the final phase in the hair cycle and lasts until the fully grown hair is shed. The hair is either shed during the telogen phase or remains in place until the next anagen phase, when the new hair growing in pushes it out. About 10 percent of scalp hair is in the telogen phase at any one time. The telogen phase lasts for approximately three to six months. As soon as the telogen phase ends, the hair returns to the anagen phase and begins the entire ycle again. On average, the entire growth cycle repeats itself once every four to five years

 

 

 

Term

329) Which is know as the "Transitional Stage" of the hair of hair growth:

A) Halogen

B) Telagen

C) Catagan

D) Anagen

Definition

                                              CATAGEN

The catagen phase (KAT-uh-jen FAYZ) is the brief transition period between the growth and resting phases of a hair follicle. It signals the end of the anagen phase. During the catagen phase, the follicle canal shrinks and detaches from the dermal papilla. The hair bulb disappears and the shrunken root end forms a rounded club. Less than one percent of scalp hair is in the catagen phase at any time. The catagen phase is very short, lasting from one to two weeks.

Term

330) The Growth Stage of hair lasts between:

A) 1 & 7 years

B) 2 & 5 years

C) 2 & 6 months

D) 8 & 10 years 

Definition

                                           1 & 7 years ?

During the anagen phase (AN-uh-jen FAYZ), also known as growth phase, new hair is produced. New cells are actively manufactured in the hair follicle. During this phase, hair cells are produced faster than any other normal cell in the human body. The average growth of healthy scalp hair is about ½ (0.5) inch (1.25 centimeters) per month. The rate of growth varies  on different parts of the body, between sexes, and with age. Scalp hair grows faster on women than on men. Scalp hair grows rapidly between the ages of 15 and 30, but slows down sharply after the age of 50. About 90 percent of scalp hair is growing in the anagen phase at any time. The anagen phase generally lasts from three to five years, but in some cases, it can last as long as 10 years. The longer the anagen cycle is, the longer the hair is able to grow. This is why some people can only grow their hair down to their shoulders, while others can grow it down to the floor!

Term

333) Type of design line used to create length and height in a hair cut:

A) Curved lines

B) Diagional lines

C) Horizontal Lines

D) Verticle Lines

Definition

[image]

VERTICLE

Line defines form and space. The presence of one nearly always means that the other two are involved. Lines create the shape, design, and movement of a hairstyle. The eye follows the lines in a design. They can be straight or curved. There are four basic types of lines:

Vertical lines create length and height in hair design. They make a hairstyle appear longer and narrower as the eye follows the lines up and down 

Horizontal lines create width in hair design. They extend in the same direction and maintain a constant distance apart—from the floor or horizon

Diagonal lines are positioned between horizontal and vertical lines. They are often used to emphasize or minimize facial features. Diagonal lines are also used to create interest in hair design 

Curved lines, lines moving in a circular or semi-circular direction, soften a design. They can be large or small, a full circle, or just part  of a circle  Curved lines may move in a clockwise or counter-clockwise direction. They can be placed horizontally, vertically, or diagonally. Curved lines repeating in opposite directions create a wave

 

 

Term

334) Type of design line used to make the hairstyle appear Longer and narrower:

A) Curved lines

B) Diagional lines

C) Horizontal Lines

D) Verticle Lines

Definition

[image]

VERTICLE

Line defines form and space. The presence of one nearly always means that the other two are involved. Lines create the shape, design, and movement of a hairstyle. The eye follows the lines in a design. They can be straight or curved. There are four basic types of lines:

Vertical lines create length and height in hair design. They make a hairstyle appear longer and narrower as the eye follows the lines up and down 

Horizontal lines create width in hair design. They extend in the same direction and maintain a constant distance apart—from the floor or horizon

Diagonal lines are positioned between horizontal and vertical lines. They are often used to emphasize or minimize facial features. Diagonal lines are also used to create interest in hair design  

Curved lines, lines moving in a circular or semi-circular direction, soften a design. They can be large or small, a full circle, or just part  of a circle  Curved lines may move in a clockwise or counter-clockwise direction. They can be placed horizontally, vertically, or diagonally. Curved lines repeating in opposite directions create a wave

Term

335) Type of design line that are straight up and down:

A) Curved lines

B) Diagional lines

C) Horizontal Lines

D) Verticle Lines

Definition

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VERTICLE

Line defines form and space. The presence of one nearly always means that the other two are involved. Lines create the shape, design, and movement of a hairstyle. The eye follows the lines in a design. They can be straight or curved. There are four basic types of lines:

Vertical lines create length and height in hair design. They make a hairstyle appear longer and narrower as the eye follows the lines up and down 

Horizontal lines create width in hair design. They extend in the same direction and maintain a constant distance apart—from the floor or horizon

Diagonal lines are positioned between horizontal and vertical lines. They are often used to emphasize or minimize facial features. Diagonal lines are also used to create interest in hair design  

Curved lines, lines moving in a circular or semi-circular direction, soften a design. They can be large or small, a full circle, or just part  of a circle  Curved lines may move in a clockwise or counter-clockwise direction. They can be placed horizontally, vertically, or diagonally. Curved lines repeating in opposite directions create a wave

Term

336) Type of design line that are parallel to the floor, used to create width, or bulk in the finishing design:

A) Curved lines

B) Diagional lines

C) Horizontal Lines

D) Verticle Lines

Definition

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HORIZONTAL

Line defines form and space. The presence of one nearly always means that the other two are involved. Lines create the shape, design, and movement of a hairstyle. The eye follows the lines in a design. They can be straight or curved. There are four basic types of lines:

Horizontal lines create width in hair design. They extend in the same direction and maintain a constant distance apart—from the floor or horizon

Vertical lines create length and height in hair design. They make a hairstyle appear longer and narrower as the eye follows the lines up and down 

Diagonal lines are positioned between horizontal and vertical lines. They are often used to emphasize or minimize facial features. Diagonal lines are also used to create interest in hair design  

Curved lines, lines moving in a circular or semi-circular direction, soften a design. They can be large or small, a full circle, or just part  of a circle  Curved lines may move in a clockwise or counter-clockwise direction. They can be placed horizontally, vertically, or diagonally. Curved lines repeating in opposite directions create a wave

Term

349) The ability of the hair to absorb moisture is referred to as it's:

A) Strength

B) ATG

C) Elasticity 

D) Porosity 

 

Definition

POROSITY

Hair porosity is the ability of the hair to absorb moisture. The degree of porosity is directly related to the condition of the cuticle layer. Healthy hair with a compact cuticle layer is naturally resistant to being penetrated by moisture and is referred to as hydrophobic (hy-druh-FOHB-ik). Porous hair has a raised cuticle layer that easily absorbs moisture and is called hydrophilic                         (hy-druh-FIL-ik).Hair with low porosity is considered resistant. Chemical services performed on hair with low porosity require a more alkaline solution than those on hair with high porosity. Alkaline solutions raise the cuticle and permit uniform saturation and processing on resistant hair. Hair with average porosity is considered to be normal hair. Chemical services performed on this type of hair will usually process as expected, according to the texture.Hair with high porosity is considered overly porous hair and is often the result of previous overprocessing, Overly porous hair is damaged, dry, fragile, and brittle. Chemical services performed on overly porous hair require less alkaline solutions with a lower pH, which help prevent additional overprocessing and damage.The texture of the hair can be an indication of its porosity, but it is only a general rule of thumb. Different degrees of porosity can be found in all hair textures. Although coarse hair normally has a low porosity and is resistant to chemical services, in some cases coarse hair will have high porosity, perhaps as the result of previous chemical services. You can check porosity on dry hair by taking a strand of several hairs from four different areas of the head (front hairline, temple, crown, and nape). Hold the strand securely with one hand while sliding the thumb and forefinger of the other hand from the end to the scalp. If the hair feels smooth and the cuticle is compact, dense, and hard, it is considered resistant. If you can feel a slight roughness, it is considered porous. If the hair feels very rough, dry, or breaks, it is considered highly porous and may have been overprocessed

 

 

Term

350) The ability of the hair to stretch and spring back without breaking:

A) Strength

B) ATG

C) Elasticity 

D) Porosity 

 

Definition

ELASTICITY TEST / PULL TEST

perform an analysis of the client’s hair and scalp. Test the hair for elasticity and porosity on several areas of the head. If the hair has poor elasticity, do not perform a relaxer service. Hair elasticity is the ability of the hair to stretch and return to its original length without breaking. Hair elasticity is an indication of the strength of the side bonds that hold the hair’s individual fibers in place. Wet hair with normal elasticity will stretch up to 50 percent of its original length and return to that same length without breaking. Dry hair stretches about 20 percent of its length. Hair with low elasticity is brittle and breaks easily. It may not be able to hold the curl from wet setting, thermal styling, or permanent waving. Hair with low elasticity is the result of weak side bonds that usually are a result of overprocessing. Chemical services performed on hair with low elasticity require a milder solution with a lower pH to minimize further damage and prevent additional overprocessing. Check elasticity on wet hair by taking an individual strand from four different areas of the head (front hairline, temple, crown, and nape). Hold a single strand of wet hair securely and try to pull it apart. If the hair stretches and returns to its original length without breaking, it has normal elasticity. If the hair breaks easily or fails to return to its original length, it has low elasticity

Term

351) Side Bonds are responsible for the:

A) Elasticity of the hair

B) Porosity of the hair

C) Strength of the hair

D) A & C

 

 

 

Definition

Elasticity of the hair

Strength of the hair

Side Bonds

The cortex is made up of millions of polypeptide chains cross-linked by three types of side bonds: disulfide, salt, and hydrogen. Side bonds are responsible for the elasticity and incredible strength of the hair. Altering these three types of side bonds is what makes wet setting, thermal styling, permanent waving, curl re-forming, and chemical  hair relaxing possible

Term

352) In what layer of the hair do you find the Side Bonds:

A) Cuticle

B) Madulla

C) Cortex

D) A & C

Definition

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CORTEX

The cortex is made up of millions of polypeptide chains cross-linked by three types of side bonds: disulfide, salt, and hydrogen. Side bonds are responsible for the elasticity and incredible strength of the hair. Altering these three types of side bonds is what makes wet setting, thermal styling, permanent waving, curl re-forming, and chemical  hair relaxing possible.

Hair is composed of the following three major components:

• The cuticle which is the outermost layer of the hair. it protects the interior cortex layer and contriubtes up to 20 ercent of the overall strength of the hair.

• The cortex which is the middle layer and gives the hair the majority of its strength and elasticity. A healthy cortex contributes about 80 percent to the overall strength of the hair. it contains the natural pigment called melanin that determines hair color. Melanin granules are scattered between the cortex cells like chips in a chocohate chip cookie.

• The medulla which is the innermost layer of the hair. it is sometimes absent from the hair and does not play a role in the haircoloring process.

Term

353) The __________ is composed of millions of polpypeptide bonds crossed linked by three types of Side Bonds:

A) Cuticle

B) Madulla

C) Cortex

D) A & C

Definition

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CORTEX

The cortex is made up of millions of polypeptide chains cross-linked by three types of side bonds: disulfide, salt, and hydrogen. Side bonds are responsible for the elasticity and incredible strength of the hair. Altering these three types of side bonds is what makes wet setting, thermal styling, permanent waving, curl re-forming, and chemical  hair relaxing possible.

Hair is composed of the following three major components:

• The cuticle which is the outermost layer of the hair. it protects the interior cortex layer and contriubtes up to 20 ercent of the overall strength of the hair.

• The cortex which is the middle layer and gives the hair the majority of its strength and elasticity. A healthy cortex contributes about 80 percent to the overall strength of the hair. it contains the natural pigment called melanin that determines hair color. Melanin granules are scattered between the cortex cells like chips in a chocohate chip cookie.

• The medulla which is the innermost layer of the hair. it is sometimes absent from the hair and does not play a role in the haircoloring process.

 

Term

354) Because chemical changes occur during the permanent wave process always preform a / an _______  prior to perming the hair:

A) P.D. Test

B) Strand Test

C) Elasticity Test

D) None of the above

Definition


ELASTICITY TEST

 Perform an analysis of the client’s hair and scalp. Test the hair for elasticity and porosity on several areas of the head. If the hair has poor elasticity, do not perform a relaxer service.Hair elasticity is the ability of the hair to stretch and return to its original length without breaking. Hair elasticity is an indication of the strength of the side bonds that hold the hair’s individual fibers in place. Wet hair with normal elasticity will stretch up to 50 percent of its original length and return to that same length without breaking. Dry hair stretches about 20 percent of its length. Hair with low elasticity is brittle and breaks easily. It may not be able to hold the curl from wet setting, thermal styling, or permanent waving. Hair with low elasticity is the result of weak side bonds that usually are a result of overprocessing. Chemical services performed on hair with low elasticity require a milder solution with a lower pH to minimize further damage and prevent additional overprocessing. Check elasticity on wet hair by taking an individual strand from four different areas of the head (front hairline, temple, crown, and nape). Hold a single strand of wet hair securely and try to pull it apart. If the hair stretches and returns to its original length without breaking, it has normal elasticity. If the hair breaks easily or fails to return to its original length, it has low elasticity

Term

356) Normal elasticity of wet hair is approximatly:

A) 40 - 50%

B) 20%

C) 1/5

D) B & C

Definition

40 - 50 %

ELASTICITY TEST

Perform an analysis of the client’s hair and scalp. Test the hair for elasticity and porosity on several areas of the head. If the hair has poor elasticity, do not perform a relaxer service.

Hair elasticity is the ability of the hair to stretch and return to its original length without breaking. Hair elasticity is an indication of the strength of the side bonds that hold the hair’s individual fibers in place. Wet hair with normal elasticity will stretch up to 50 percent of its original length and return to that same length without breaking. Dry hair stretches about 20 percent of its length. Hair with low elasticity is brittle and breaks easily. It may not be able to hold the curl from wet setting, thermal styling, or permanent waving. Hair with low elasticity is the result of weak side bonds that usually are a result of overprocessing. Chemical services performed on hair with low elasticity require a milder solution with a lower pH to minimize further damage and prevent additional overprocessing. Check elasticity on wet hair by taking an individual strand from four different areas of the head (front hairline, temple, crown, and nape). 

Hold a single strand of wet hair securely and try to pull it apart. If the hair stretches and returns to its original length without breaking, it has normal elasticity. If the hair breaks easily or fails to return to its original length, it has low elasticity

 

 

Term

357) Elasticity Test is also know as:

A) Patch Test

B) Pull Test

C) Match Test

D) Strand Test

Definition

PULL TEST

ELASTICITY TEST / PULL TEST

Perform an analysis of the client’s hair and scalp. Test the hair for elasticity and porosity on several areas of the head. If the hair has poor elasticity, do not perform a relaxer service. Hair elasticity is the ability of the hair to stretch and return to its original length without breaking. Hair elasticity is an indication of the strength of the side bonds that hold the hair’s individual fibers in place. Wet hair with normal elasticity will stretch up to 50 percent of its original length and return to that same length without breaking. Dry hair stretches about 20 percent of its length. Hair with low elasticity is brittle and breaks easily. It may not be able to hold the curl from wet setting, thermal styling, or permanent waving. Hair with low elasticity is the result of weak side bonds that usually are a result of overprocessing. Chemical services performed on hair with low elasticity require a milder solution with a lower pH to minimize further damage and prevent additional overprocessing. Check elasticity on wet hair by taking an individual strand from four different areas of the head (front hairline, temple, crown, and nape). Hold a single strand of wet hair securely and try to pull it apart. If the hair stretches and returns to its original length without breaking, it has normal elasticity. If the hair breaks easily or fails to return to its original length, it has low elasticity

 

 

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